Author Topic: Running: Training, Problems, Techniques, Questions, etc  (Read 292780 times)

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Offline alexk

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Running: Training, Problems, Techniques, Questions, etc
« on: April 24, 2004, 21:03:00 »
Well ive been doing some running and i get cramps after about 10-15 mins, does anyone know any streches or anything how to stop them or have them come later on in the run. thanks guys

(dont know if its in the wrong form this one made the most sense to me)

Alex
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 16:04:25 by kratz »

Offline quebecrunner

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2004, 21:31:00 »
Well, there is many factors tha can give you cramps... Lets start with the first one: eating. You should run about 2 hours after a meal (even if the army do not respect this rule  :D  )

Second, hydratation. If your urine is yellow before the run, it means that you are not fully hydrated. But do not drink too much. You have to experiment by yourself.

Tertio, Calcium. Cramps may be due by a lack of calcium. Why? Because the muscular work is dependent on the release/recapture of calcium ions. Since you are young, drink 3 cup of milk per day.

fourth, muscle itself. I mean by that if you start running too fast, you make a lot of lactic acid but your muscle cannot spontaneously convert it in a most efficient form (named pyruvic acid). So, your muscle will became "acid" and will tell you that you are in some sort killing it by giving you cramps.  

Start Slowly then after 10-20 minutes you can go fast as you like. You will not build as many lactic acid than starting fast because you‘ve made some sort of gradual metabolic switch pretty **** difficult to explain in english( after all, i‘m just a french cdn).

I hope i have helped you!
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Offline Theoat

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2004, 22:24:00 »
Another thing to add to what they had already stated is start slow and watch your breathing.  When I first started running I would breathe faster and faster till I eventually was panting and gasping for more air. I find inhaling deeply through the nose and exhaling through the mouth works well. Hope that helps....

Offline alexk

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2004, 23:29:00 »
hey guys thanks, quebecrunner i understand what your saying. If you want you could explain it in french, ive been going to a french imersion school since I was in kindergarden. Again thanks alot gonna be drinking alot of water and milk (is chocolate milk ok) lol

take care
Au revoir
Alex

Offline BeadWindow(Banned)

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2004, 23:59:00 »
Actually the nutritional value in chocolate milk is similar to white. Its not as big as people think.
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Offline bossi

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2004, 13:20:00 »
Potassium helps prevent muscle cramps - readily available in bananas and Gatorade-type products.
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Offline Nerf herder

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2004, 12:42:00 »
You can also try extract of Sarsparilla root....liquid form. Extreemly high in potassium and get in the blood stream faster. Take it about 1/2 hour prior and your good to go. All natural...no adverse effects (AFAIR). Consult a doc prior though.

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Offline alexk

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2004, 20:51:00 »
Guys, thanks ALOT ive been drinking water like i breath and I eat a couple of bannanas a day. I usualy run 10 mins and get a cramp at about 5 today i went 25 and got nothing. Thanks again.

Offline GrahamD

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Re: Running problems
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2004, 21:41:00 »
Quote
How do I know if I have got stitch ?
Typically, stitch is felt in the right upper abdomen, but may also occur on the left hand side, or may irradiate to upper or lower regions of the body. "Classic" stitch is more likely to occur to insufficiently trained people than well prepared athletes.

What causes Stitch ?
The reason for stitch is pretty simple. The inner organs are hanging from several ligaments, which, in turn, are fixed to the diaphragm, the muscular "plate" between chest and abdomen. Liver, spleen, stomach, small intestine and colon form a weight of several kilograms, hanging from the diaphragm. The impact of every step forces the inner organs to move downwards. Additionally, the diaphragm moves upwards on every expiration to force air out of the lungs. This continuous up/down stress may cause a cramp in the diaphragm: stitch. Stitch occurs most often on the right hand side because of the liver being the most heavy organ, and therefore the one stressing the diaphragm the most.

How do I get rid of Stitch ?
Should you suffer from stitch, the first (and best) cure is to slow down or stop until the stitch is gone. If you do not want to stop, you can try to press your hand onto the part of your abdomen where the stitch is, and release the pressure on expiration. Repeat this several times.

Tim Quinlivan, a PE Teacher in Australia, has found the following method works well with his young athletes:

Slow your pace slightly
Grasp your side where you feel the stitch just under the bottom rib and half way across between the side and the belly button. Thumb to the rear and fingers to the front
Squeeze firmly and bend at the waist (45-90 degrees) while still running
After about 15 metres slowing straighten
The stitch should have gone
An advanced method requires some thoughts about the reason why stitches occur. You should try to synchronise your breathing pattern with your running, and exhale when the foot on the not hurting side touches the ground, i.e. when you have stitch in your right hand side, try to exhale when your left foot touches the ground. You do not need to worry about inspiration - if your expiration is right, your inspiration will be, too. If you manage to keep this breathing pattern, your diaphragm moves downward at the same time as your intestines, thus decreasing the stress.

How can I avoid Stitch ?
Strengthen your abdominal muscles, keep your upper body warm, do not run too soon after meals and learn "abdominal breathing".
 

Arty

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Running
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2003, 15:42:00 »
Just to train myself better for BOTP, at what speed shall I run and what distance?  also at BOTP do you run everyday (like Mon thru Friday or are there breaks..

I can do 5km run at 6.5mph for 5 days in a row at treadmill, Is it good enou  :rocket:  gh?

Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Running
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2003, 15:47:00 »
Try and stay away from treadmills.. They aren‘t as good as running on actual earth/pavement.

Dire

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Re: Running
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2003, 16:18:00 »
I also found that runnin not on a tread mill is harder because of the mental bordom..  :p

You run 5km infront of your TV which your TV provides a good distraction.. Running outside I find out more difficult since you get fatuged not only by the weather but by up hill/ down hill and also from the mental bordom..

I guess I need to buy a good CD player/headphones. but I can‘t afford it now..

Offline CFN. Orange

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Re: Running
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2003, 19:19:00 »
well the standard is
2.4 kms in 11:56 mins...

which would mean...0.2kms per minute
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Christopher

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Re: Running
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2003, 21:45:00 »
Running on a treadmill is easier and slower than running on pavement, because you‘re fighting wind resistance. The boredom is just in your head.

If you insist on running on a treadmill, set the incline at 2.0 to compensate, and run at a 6.7 pace per mile setting. That‘ll give you a real-road pace per mile of 8.3, which should be the recommended pace.

You can adjust your pace accordingly, comparing your pace with real-road running with this chart:

 http://www.trinewbies.com/2RunTreadChart.htm

I know that if you‘re training for BUD/S, they recommend a road pace per mile of 8.0, so maybe that‘s something you should aim for.

biggie786

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Running
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2003, 18:38:00 »
I am training to go for BMQ. Currently I am running approx. 5-8 km every other day and also doing push up, situp and chinups. Do you guys think 5-8km is ok enough? Also does speed count or just should i just concentrate on endurance.

Please advise.

Cycophant

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Re: Running
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2003, 21:32:00 »
Why bother setting a limit?  

Just continue to push yourself as much as you can.  Anything you can get above and beyond the average or minimum, the better.  Limiting yourself to the minimum, the average, or even the exceptional is foolishness.

That being said, 5 to 8 kilometers is pretty substantial.  Be proud of your accomplishments and continue on.

Offline Bert

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Re: Running
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2003, 22:21:00 »
On the other hand, don‘t push yourself so hard that you injure yourself and then have to take time off to recover.  

Its sounds like your cardio and conditioning is great.  Maintain it but don‘t go over-board.

If you can do 2.4 kms in 12 minutes, or better in 10 minutes or less, your pace for that distance is great.  For 6 kms, you pace will be slower.  You may want to train for the 10 km races and that info is on the net.

The danger is pushing yourself too hard.  Running is a great exercise but avoid risking foot or muscle injuries then have to carry it into BMQ.  Just be careful.

Im no expert, but training for endurance and speed together is better than than only one.  In BMQ, SQ, and in the field, your activites require strength and endurance.  The obstacle course stresses the body differently than a straight 6 knm run which is different from a 15 km ruck mark in 2 hours 26 minutes.

I‘d mix wind sprints/interval training to build VO2 and strength and mix in a one longer run for mucle conditioning per week.

If your running is good, loose a running session or two a week and try mixing a weight routine and build more power for the arms, upper back, lower back and shoulders.  Lugging a ruck 15 kms not only puts you in a cardio range, but you need the strength to support heavy loads.

klumanth

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Re: Running
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2003, 22:53:00 »
As was said, don‘t push yourself too hard.  Unless you‘ve been running for a long time I would not recommend running more than every other day(and that‘s at most).  5-8km is plenty for starting.  Yes, you should set fitness goals.  Set out what it is you eventually want to achieve.  If you can do the 2.4km in 9:30 you‘re doing very good.  Then set out some small goals along the way.  Reaching these small goals will help motivate you to reach your final goal.  If you‘re really keen you could also get a pair of hand grips to practice for the test.

biggie786

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Re: Running
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2003, 23:02:00 »
Thanks you guys!!! It‘s a great help. Recruiter also told me that for the first week in BMQ they make u do Shuttle Cork runs. Does anyoneknow what exactly it is and what is the timming they use. Thanks to all of you.

klumanth

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Re: Running
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2003, 01:30:00 »
Perhaps he was referring to the 20 meter shuttle run or 20msr for short (also known as the "beep" test).  20 MSR is the way the CF evaluates your cardio.  It‘s much more accurate than the step test.  Basically you run back and forth between two lines which are 20m apart at a speed dictated by a tape or CD playing.  After each minute you reach a new stage and the speed increases.  You‘ll feel it after running this test.

klumanth

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Re: Running
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2003, 11:20:00 »
For a male under 35 you require level 6 to pass.  You should try and aim for the incentive levels
Male 17-19 is level 10
Male 20-29 is level 10.5
Male 30-39 is level 8.0

Those are the only ones I remember.  If you reach the incentive level on the shuttle run and on the other portions of the test, your test is good for two years instead of one.

klumanth

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Re: Running
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2003, 11:34:00 »
A lot of people aren‘t good with the shuttle run.  Instead of a straight run, you‘re running and stopping constantly which is a bit harder to take.  The good news is that every time you do it, you‘ll have a better sense for the timing and your scores should improve each time you do it.  It wasn‘t until my third or fourth test that I reached the incentive level.

biggie786

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Re: Running
« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2003, 12:54:00 »
what happens if u do not reach level 6 or 7? do u get kicked out?

klumanth

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Re: Running
« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2003, 14:40:00 »
If you cannot reach your minimum level on the run that means you fail your express test.  If you cannot pass your express test by the end of Basic Training you may get recoursed and have to do the whole thing over again.  If you continue to fail it you will eventually get released.

biggie786

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Re: Running
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2003, 22:11:00 »
Is there large number of recruits who can‘t pass the express test and have to redo the training?