Author Topic: THE NEW VETERANS CHARTER: MOVING FORWARD - JUN 2014  (Read 7263 times)

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Offline George Wallace

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THE NEW VETERANS CHARTER: MOVING FORWARD - JUN 2014
« on: June 03, 2014, 14:49:57 »
Here, without some protest organization with an agenda to push, is THE NEW VETERANS CHARTER: MOVING FORWARD, a Report of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs, Greg Kerr - Chair, dated June 2014 during 41st Parliament, Second Session.


https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/1180719-the-new-veterans-charter.html

« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 20:14:31 by kratz »
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: THE NEW VETERANS CHARTER: MOVING FORWARD - JUN 2014
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2014, 15:28:45 »
Thanks for sharing that so quickly, GW.

I'm firewalled against documentcloud.org here, so here's a link to the report from the Committee's page, as well as the "GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS" from the report attached in case neither link works.

After a quick skim, all I can say is that it'll take a lot of co-ordination between VAC and DND - and bucks.  I look forward to seeing the Government's response.

Edited to add the Vets Ombudsman's initial take:
Quote
Canada's Veterans Ombudsman, Guy Parent, today welcomed the release of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs’ report on the New Veterans Charter. The New Veterans Charter: Moving Forward backs the call for action last fall by the Veterans Ombudsman’s in his report, Improving the New Veterans Charter and Actuarial Analysis.

“The recommendations in the Committee’s report are an important step forward to resolve current gaps in the New Veterans Charter,” said Mr. Parent. “I believe that the Committee’s action is a turning point for Veterans’ issues and I am encouraged by the Minister of Veterans Affairs statement today that the Government is prepared to consider many of the report’s recommendations. If Veterans Affairs Canada moves quickly on their implementation, we will be on the road to making the lives of many Veterans and their families easier as they transition from military to civilian life. The Office of the Veterans Ombudsman stands ready to offer assistance to the Department to move implementation forward as quickly as possible.”

Mr. Parent said that he is pleased that the Committee took up most of his recommendations and, in particular, that the Veterans Bill of Rights be included in the New Veterans Charter and in the Pension Act and that the Charter be liberally construed and clearly recognize the obligation of the Government of Canada and all Canadians to its Veterans and their families.

The Veterans Ombudsman began calling for a comprehensive review of the New Veterans Charter in the spring of 2013. Extensive consultations with Veterans and Veterans’ organizations confirmed the findings of the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman’s evidence-based analysis of the Charter, which identified substantive gaps in the key areas of financial, vocational rehabilitation and assistance, and family support. In the fall of 2013, the Minister of Veterans Affairs directed the Committee to make the review all-inclusive.

“If the Government follows through on these recommendations, then the New Veterans Charter will be viewed much more positively by injured or ill Veterans. It will also better meet their needs by helping them to re-integrate successfully into civilian life and by helping them to achieve what every Canadian strives for: a good job, financial independence, a reasonable quality of personal and family life, along with the best possible health.  Importantly, if their medical condition or illness does not allow them to return to work, then these Veterans will be confident that they will receive the support they need to live their lives with financial security and dignity.”

Mr. Parent leaves today to participate in the 70th Anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy in France. When he returns, he will offer a more in-depth analysis of what the report means to Veterans and their families. As well, the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman will closely monitor progress in the implementation of the recommendations.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 15:46:07 by milnews.ca »
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Offline blackberet17

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/stephen-harper-partially-disowns-veterans-charter-amid-demands-fantino-resign-1.2866858

Quote
The new veterans charter, a marquee deal defended and championed by Stephen Harper's Conservatives since 2006, suddenly became a "Liberal policy" Tuesday as the government weathered more demands for Julian Fantino's resignation.

The veterans affairs minister, who was on his feet constantly during the previous day's question period, rose infrequently on Tuesday in the face of an unrelenting barrage of NDP and Liberal attacks.

Instead, he was defended by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who tried to put some political distance between his government and a class-action lawsuit in B.C. that argues the charter is unconstitutional and discriminatory against modern veterans.

"It's actually a court case against the previous Liberal policy," Harper told the House, prompting catcalls of "shame" from the opposition benches.

"In any case, we have repeatedly enhanced the benefits under that policy to the tune of some $5 billion, opposed every step of the way by the Liberal party, who has voted against all those benefits.

"They can keep voting against those benefits for veterans. We will keep bringing them forward."

Charter was supported by all parties
The charter was conceived and passed by Paul Martin's Liberals with the support of all parties.

It was put into force by Harper's Conservatives as one of their first acts after forming a minority government in 2006.

"I want our troops to know that we support them. This veterans charter is one example of our government's commitment," Harper said on April 6, 2006, the day the legislation was enacted.

"Our troops' commitment and service to Canada entitles them to the very best treatment possible. This charter is but a first step towards according Canadian veterans the respect and support they deserve."

When concerns and complaints that the charter was not as generous as the old Pension Act system began to surface a few years later, the government doubled down in its support and introduced changes to the legislation, including hundreds of millions of dollars in program improvements for the most seriously wounded.

"Our government promised that the new veterans charter would evolve with the needs of the men and women it serves. With our latest enhancements, we're delivering on that promise," said Steven Blaney, the veterans minister at the time.

The notion that Harper would even partially disown the policy was jaw-dropping to opposition critics.

"I find that incredible," said NDP veterans critic Peter Stoffer.

"They're not taking ownership; they mislead you — or they outright lie about it."

'We deliver service to the veterans': PM
A group of veterans from Canada's war in Afghanistan launched a class-action lawsuit in 2012.

In defending against it, justice department lawyers argued the government does not have an extraordinary obligation under the law to those who have served.

While conceding in a hearing last week that the new system is "less generous" than the old one, government lawyer Travis Henderson argued that current and future governments cannot be bound by the political promises of previous administrations.

Harper's government, which rarely misses an opportunity to express their devotion to the troops, has repeated ducked questions aimed at clearing up the contradiction by saying it cannot comment on an ongoing court case.

The Conservatives have been under fire for describing the nearly 900 job cuts at Veterans Affairs as impacting only the backroom bureaucracy, involving jobs that were either wasteful or redundant.

"The NDP wanted to keep bureaucrats to do nothing but cross us and delay payments to veterans under a program it actually voted against," Harper said.

"On this side, we cut down the bureaucracy. We deliver service to the veterans."

The government's own budget documents show the majority of the job cuts were in the disability awards branch, the area singled out for criticism in the fall 2014 auditor general's report for being too slow to approve mental health treatment.
« Ne vous occupez pas d'eux; ils ne savent pas tirer. [...] Il y a des ennemis devant nous, derrière nous et sur nos flancs. Il ne reste qu'une place sans danger, soit vers l'objectif. » Paul Triquet, VC

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If only there were some ideas out there to make the plan better, say, from the Ombudsman (more here), an all-party committee of politicians, or even from Senators.

And if only we had a governing party with a clear majority in the House of Commons that could get things passed no matter what the opposition parties wanted.

One can only dare to dream.
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

Tony Prudori
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Offline dunlop303

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New Veterans Charter - Rated at %100
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2015, 11:26:08 »
Good Morning Guys,

Are there any additional benefits that arise under the new veterans charter once the lump sum payments reach %100?
I know under the old system you could then get the EIA / PIA,, Are we just put out to pasture once we cap out?

Offline stokerwes

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Re: New Veterans Charter - Rated at %100
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2015, 11:52:32 »
If you can prove that your totally and permanently incapacitated (TPI) you are then eligible to apply for Permanent Impairment Allowance (PIA) and the PIA supplement. Also apply for the family caregiver allowance if it applies. But just because you have applied does not necessarily mean you will get these benefits.
I am just about to begin the process of applying for PIA so I am unsure of how it exactly works. They stopped giving my injuries any percentage at 115% all under the NVC because I was too stupid to apply when the events actually happened.
The old system allows for spouses and children. NVC doesn't with the exception of the family caregiver benefit.
Good luck

Offline dunlop303

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Re: New Veterans Charter - Rated at %100
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2015, 13:14:21 »
Thanks Man I appreciate the response, I had applied for both the EIA and the PIA in the past, but that was before my latest diagnosis and % bump to 100.
Maybe i'll give it another shot.

Stupid system, for those who suffer and strive to work do not get the benefits, where I could easily "give up" and get all the benefits available.

Offline blackberet17

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Re: New Veterans Charter - Rated at %100
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2015, 15:12:04 »
EIA and PIA are two separate animals, and the requirements are different for each one.

A couple key points to remember:

1) EIA is not available under the NVC;
2) You can't have EIA AND PIA;
3) For EIA, you have to be assessed at 98% or higher, it's the minimum threshold you have to have reached to apply;
4) PIA is monthly, but taxable, for life or until you no longer meet the eligibility requirements;
5) EIA is tax-free, monthly.

EIA: http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/after-injury/disability-benefits/benefits-determined/table-of-disabilities/ch-07-2006

PIA: http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/news/vac-responds/just-the-facts/permanent-impairment-allowance

Big key is EIA is
« Ne vous occupez pas d'eux; ils ne savent pas tirer. [...] Il y a des ennemis devant nous, derrière nous et sur nos flancs. Il ne reste qu'une place sans danger, soit vers l'objectif. » Paul Triquet, VC