Author Topic: which trade to join  (Read 2743 times)

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Offline ccyl18

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which trade to join
« on: October 08, 2015, 22:48:37 »
I was born and raised in Hong Kong before university, and also a Canadian citizen. I have a law degree from the UK, and now doing a kinesiology degree. I'm thinking of applying to the forces after working for a civilian job for some years. I feel so uncertain what trade to do. All I know is I want to join the military for years. I chose Kinesiology as my 2nd degree when I planned to be a physiotherapist in the forces; sadly now I won’t follow this path for various reasons. And my degree results aren't good enough to be a legal officer. And I'm an introvert. Especially because English is not my first language, it’s harder for me to follow when people are speaking fast. And my verbal skills aren’t very good.

Which are the trades suits me the best and not so difficult to get in? I don’t want to end up in a trade turn out that I don’t like it. Trades that we have to work with not many people and have more personal time work better for me. What are your suggestions? I guess maybe ACISS, Signal Officer and Intelligence. For ACISS, I saw someone said a lot of teamwork is involved; but it’s not so difficult to get accepted. For signal officer and intelligence, do I need a specific university degree, like computer science for signal officer? At the same time, I’m also not confident with dealing with computer software. I lack confidence and didn’t speak much in biomechanics lab when working with a group of 5 people dealing with complicated computer software. Hopefully time and effort could help me with improving my confidence and skills.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2015, 00:07:36 by ccyl18 »

Offline Dimsum

    West coast best coast.

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Re: which trade to join
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2015, 23:07:13 »
First off, is your reluctance to speak much in a group of people because you can't follow them when they speak quickly? 

All trades have some teamwork aspect to them - unfortunately you can't just pick a trade and hope to hide away and never work with anyone.  A large portion of Basic training, NCM or Officer, is teamwork.  As an Officer, you're expected to lead people as well, sometimes very early in your career. 

As for the "minimum requirement", if you read some other posts you'll find that people have been waiting to join for months, maybe years, and most if not all of them aren't just going in with the minimum requirements.  If you do decide to go for a trade, I wish you luck but, harsh as this may sound, I wouldn't count on your chances. 
Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

Reply:  "If."

Offline ccyl18

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Re: which trade to join
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2015, 23:29:31 »
Thanks for your reply.

I've done loads of research. I know basic training much teamwork, and any kind of trades in the army must involve certain amount of teamwork. And I know this is not my strength. That's why I have involve myself in some roles in societies, Toastmaster (public speaking) and playing futsal.

Regarding biomechanics lab I mentioned, I find the computer software very complicated. This is one of the very few labs with complicated computer stuff. I'm just not used to it. I tried my best to contribute to the group, especially I always remind myself I wanna join the army.

Offline Loachman

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Re: which trade to join
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2015, 23:28:30 »
Apply.

You will not know how well you could do until until you take that first step.

While confidence is good, a little self-doubt is not a bad thing. It makes people seek, and accept, advice, and try a little bit harder. And that is good.

We do not expect brilliance and perfection from applicants.

We try and teach that, though.

Chinese? Bring me some of The Food of Your People, and yer in.

I am prejudiced in your favour, based upon the performance of your kinfolk that I have seen.

That Dimsun fellow may be a little dodgy, though.