Author Topic: What does the Canadian Navy exactly do? And more specific questions...  (Read 2992 times)

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Offline overwatch

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Hello everyone,

I am researching about the Canadian Navy. In my time researching I have come across general answers. I am interested in joining as a MARS officer but was wondering about the following questions:

1. What does the Canadian Navy do? More specifically are we more about the protection of Canada's coast or do we help countries that need aid in sea combat (if any are in such a conflict today, I am unsure)?

2. Is it common nowadays for our ships to engage in combat situations? I understand that our Navy is trained for combat situations but I'm wondering how often we engage in it.

3. Have there been any Navy staff that have lost their lives in the past two decades? (RIP and thank you for your service :cdn:)

4. What is the Navy's role if we are called into a war? Does this depend mainly on strategy employed such as prioritizing coast defense or helping allies or sometimes both?

Thanks everyone.

Edit: Additional question

5. Is the service length of all Navy trades the same? I am asking because after my service as a MARS officer (which is 3 years, I believe) can I retire and pursue medical school and apply to become a medical officer? This is the second trade I like but I first need to become accepted to a Canadian medical school, complete residency, etc.

I apologize if my questions sound ignorant or simple minded. It's not my intention. These are big commitments and would like to know everything before moving forward.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 20:21:49 by overwatch »

Offline Chief Stoker

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Hello everyone,

I am researching about the Canadian Navy. In my time researching I have come across general answers. I am interested in joining as a MARS officer but was wondering about the following questions:

1. What does the Canadian Navy do? More specifically are we more about the protection of Canada's coast or do we help countries that need aid in sea combat (if any are in such a conflict today, I am unsure)?

2. Is it common nowadays for our ships to engage in combat situations? I understand that our Navy is trained for combat situations but I'm wondering how often we engage in it.

3. Have there been any Navy staff that have lost their lives in the past two decades? (RIP and thank you for your service :cdn:)

4. What is the Navy's role if we are called into a war? Does this depend mainly on strategy employed such as prioritizing coast defense or helping allies or sometimes both?

Thanks everyone.


1. Goggle it
2. It has happened and could happen at anytime when you deploy, that's why we train so hard.
3. Yes
4. Depends on the role the government sets for us.
"When your draught exceeds your depth, you are most assuredly aground"

All opinions stated are not official policy of the CF and of a private individual

كافر

Offline Blake C.

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Hello everyone,

I am researching about the Canadian Navy. In my time researching I have come across general answers. I am interested in joining as a MARS officer but was wondering about the following questions:

1. What does the Canadian Navy do? More specifically are we more about the protection of Canada's coast or do we help countries that need aid in sea combat (if any are in such a conflict today, I am unsure)?

2. Is it common nowadays for our ships to engage in combat situations? I understand that our Navy is trained for combat situations but I'm wondering how often we engage in it.

3. Have there been any Navy staff that have lost their lives in the past two decades? (RIP and thank you for your service :cdn:)

4. What is the Navy's role if we are called into a war? Does this depend mainly on strategy employed such as prioritizing coast defense or helping allies or sometimes both?

Thanks everyone.
I am currently waiting to do my medical and interview in the next couple weeks here to go in as a boatswain so I am not very qualified to speak forsure, but a good start would be to go on forces.ca and look at the current operations. It should give you a good idea of what's going on for the navy. I am sure some far more qualified people on this forum can help you though.

Offline overwatch

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Thanks for the input guys.

Blake C. thanks for the Current Operations List suggestion, this helps a lot. Congratulations btw.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 20:23:32 by overwatch »

Offline Pusser

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The primary responsibility of the Canadian Armed Forces (of which the Navy is a part), is the defence of Canada.  After that, there is a declining order of responsibilities (defence of North America, defence of NATO, etc) all the way down to, whatever the government decides it wants us to do.  Nevertheless, the RCN is a "blue water" navy, meaning we operate internationally as best we can (can be difficult sometimes considering our size). We operate as part of NATO and other international maritime task groups.

Thankfully, we have not lost any personnel in the last few decades to outright combat against an armed enemy, but we have lost a few in training accidents and unfortunate occurrences in foreign ports.  We've even had at least one sailor lost at sea, but we don't know if that was a suicide or not.  Frankly, our most dangerous opponent of late is the sea itself.

Once you're in and have completed your obligatory service, you will be eligible to apply for the Military Medical Training Program (MMTP), which will send you to a Canadian medical school (although you have to get accepted to it on your own) and seek to qualify you as an MD.  This will incur further obligatory service, but you get to go to medical school on the Queen's dime (all tuition, books and equipment are paid for) and at full salary (likely as a Lt(N)).  Should you choose the direct route (i.e. apply to medical school now), the Medical Officer Training Program (MOTP) is available, which is similar to the MMTP, but your salary while in school will likely be considerably less.
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Basically, as with every other navies in the world in relation to their own country, Canada's Navy responsibilities are the seaward defence of Canada and the defence of Canada's maritime interests on the high seas.

Thankfully, we have not lost any personnel in the last few decades to outright combat against an armed enemy, but we have lost a few in training accidents and unfortunate occurrences in foreign ports.  We've even had at least one sailor lost at sea, but we don't know if that was a suicide or not.  Frankly, our most dangerous opponent of late is the sea itself.

Two quotes come to mind: 

"The great Brotherhood of seafarers of all nations is borne of the fact that the sea does not discriminate: It wants to kill us all"  - Unknown -

and

"This is a story of a ship, of men and of the sea. The men are the heroes, the ship the heroin, and the villain is the sea, the cruel sea, made more cruel by the acts of other men."  from The Cruel Sea by  -Montserrat-

Offline WeatherdoG

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Hello everyone,

I am researching about the Canadian Navy. In my time researching I have come across general answers. I am interested in joining as a MARS officer but was wondering about the following questions:

1. What does the Canadian Navy do? More specifically are we more about the protection of Canada's coast or do we help countries that need aid in sea combat (if any are in such a conflict today, I am unsure)?

2. Is it common nowadays for our ships to engage in combat situations? I understand that our Navy is trained for combat situations but I'm wondering how often we engage in it.

3. Have there been any Navy staff that have lost their lives in the past two decades? (RIP and thank you for your service :cdn:)

4. What is the Navy's role if we are called into a war? Does this depend mainly on strategy employed such as prioritizing coast defense or helping allies or sometimes both?

Thanks everyone.

Edit: Additional question

5. Is the service length of all Navy trades the same? I am asking because after my service as a MARS officer (which is 3 years, I believe) can I retire and pursue medical school and apply to become a medical officer? This is the second trade I like but I first need to become accepted to a Canadian medical school, complete residency, etc.

I apologize if my questions sound ignorant or simple minded. It's not my intention. These are big commitments and would like to know everything before moving forward.

1. The Navy spends an inordinate amount of time doing jobs out of order so that they must be done again at the last minute with the maximum amount of effort and crew time wasted. Ie. store many boxes of dry goods so that they can be moved a few days later to do work in a fuel tank, move garbage(gash) from one point to another on ship so that it looks like people are busy, fuel the ship to max amounts so that two weeks later you can defuel the ship, etc...

2. Ships tend to sail about here and there in a "combat is imminent" (1 in 2) state of readiness mostly so that the crew gets reasonable rest and there is less time that the heads are out of bounds for cleaning/inspection. A missile being fired at the ocean miles away is sufficient to generate stories of valour and daring to last generations.

3. Sailors have lost their lives in service to the nation in combat, though that combat was in Afghanistan... A land-locked country.

4. The role of the RCN in an potential war depends of many factors, but rest assured if you are a MARS officer and the navy needs to fight you'll be in the thick of it.

5. Your Terms Of Service(TOS) are dependant on your trade and the conditions at the time of signing. Most occupations without mandatory schooling are between 3 and 5 years.

Offline Humphrey Bogart

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The primary responsibility of the Canadian Armed Forces (of which the Navy is a part), is the defence of Canada.  After that, there is a declining order of responsibilities (defence of North America, defence of NATO, etc) all the way down to, whatever the government decides it wants us to do.  Nevertheless, the RCN is a "blue water" navy, meaning we operate internationally as best we can (can be difficult sometimes considering our size). We operate as part of NATO and other international maritime task groups.

Thankfully, we have not lost any personnel in the last few decades to outright combat against an armed enemy, but we have lost a few in training accidents and unfortunate occurrences in foreign ports.  We've even had at least one sailor lost at sea, but we don't know if that was a suicide or not.  Frankly, our most dangerous opponent of late is the sea itself.

Once you're in and have completed your obligatory service, you will be eligible to apply for the Military Medical Training Program (MMTP), which will send you to a Canadian medical school (although you have to get accepted to it on your own) and seek to qualify you as an MD.  This will incur further obligatory service, but you get to go to medical school on the Queen's dime (all tuition, books and equipment are paid for) and at full salary (likely as a Lt(N)).  Should you choose the direct route (i.e. apply to medical school now), the Medical Officer Training Program (MOTP) is available, which is similar to the MMTP, but your salary while in school will likely be considerably less.

Calling the RCN a blue water Navy at this moment in time is a pretty bold statement.  We're blue water if someone else brings the gear!  Kind of like saying I'm a fisherman, as long as someone else provides me all the gear.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 10:31:39 by Humphrey Bogart »

Offline Halifax Tar

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Hello everyone,

I am researching about the Canadian Navy. In my time researching I have come across general answers. I am interested in joining as a MARS officer but was wondering about the following questions:

1. What does the Canadian Navy do? More specifically are we more about the protection of Canada's coast or do we help countries that need aid in sea combat (if any are in such a conflict today, I am unsure)?

As stated before, we (The RCN) are part in parcel of the CAFs and follow those directives.  No real open warfare on the seas ATM but the sea lanes and Naval combat will in all likely hood become "hot" should any conflict arise with opposing major powers.

2. Is it common nowadays for our ships to engage in combat situations? I understand that our Navy is trained for combat situations but I'm wondering how often we engage in it.

Not really.  Charlottetown, was in the vicinity of some fire a few years ago but nothing really to write home about, A seaking engaged a pirate skiff with a C6 a few years ago, again not really posing any danger to major surface combatant like a CPF.

3. Have there been any Navy staff that have lost their lives in the past two decades? (RIP and thank you for your service :cdn:)

We have lost people at sea (man overboards) that is an unfortunate part of a life at sea but is rare.  PO2 Craig Blake, a Clearance Diver, sadly lost his life in the execution of his duties while deployed with the Army in Afghanistan.  We also have had sailors wounded in land operations from indirect fire and other enemy contact.  This really doesn't involve Naval operations though as they were employed on land with the Army.  Also we do have accidents and loss of life to due health related issues, as any organization would.

4. What is the Navy's role if we are called into a war? Does this depend mainly on strategy employed such as prioritizing coast defense or helping allies or sometimes both?

We would be employed as part of an allied coalition to keep sea lanes open and ensure the flow of supplies to land and air forward deployed units of the CAF and coalition allies.  This could involve convoy escort, sub surface, surface and air threat engagement.

Thanks everyone.

Edit: Additional question

5. Is the service length of all Navy trades the same? I am asking because after my service as a MARS officer (which is 3 years, I believe) can I retire and pursue medical school and apply to become a medical officer? This is the second trade I like but I first need to become accepted to a Canadian medical school, complete residency, etc.

I wont engage on this question as I am a PO2 and an officer would better be equipped to answer you.

I apologize if my questions sound ignorant or simple minded. It's not my intention. These are big commitments and would like to know everything before moving forward.
Lead me, follow me or get the hell out of my way

Offline Dimsum

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5. Is the service length of all Navy trades the same? I am asking because after my service as a MARS officer (which is 3 years, I believe) can I retire and pursue medical school and apply to become a medical officer? This is the second trade I like but I first need to become accepted to a Canadian medical school, complete residency, etc.

When you're in, there are programs such as the Military Medical Training Plan (MMTP) that specifically take serving members and put them through medical school.  There's more to it than simply that, but the program requirements should be online.
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Reply:  "If."

Offline Underway

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Re: What does the Canadian Navy exactly do? And more specific questions...
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2017, 14:49:47 »
MARS service is closer to 9 years for the first contract depending on your entry program.

Offline Pusser

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Re: What does the Canadian Navy exactly do? And more specific questions...
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2017, 13:16:51 »
MARS service is closer to 9 years for the first contract depending on your entry program.

Don't confuse terms of service with obligatory service.  The terms of service for a MARS officer may be for nine years (depending on entry plan), but that does not mean that he/she will have to serve nine years in order to be released or apply for other subsidized education plans (e.g. MMTP for someone wanting to become a medical officer).
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.

Offline Mike5

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Re: What does the Canadian Navy exactly do? And more specific questions...
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2017, 09:26:26 »
Basically, as with every other navies in the world in relation to their own country, Canada's Navy responsibilities are the seaward defence of Canada and the defence of Canada's maritime interests on the high seas.

Two quotes come to mind: 

"The great Brotherhood of seafarers of all nations is borne of the fact that the sea does not discriminate: It wants to kill us all"  - Unknown -

and

"This is a story of a ship, of men and of the sea. The men are the heroes, the ship the heroin, and the villain is the sea, the cruel sea, made more cruel by the acts of other men."  from The Cruel Sea by  -Montserrat-

That is a true sailor's Freudian slip if I ever saw one...
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