Author Topic: The Woodworking Thread  (Read 5327 times)

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Offline Scott

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The Woodworking Thread
« on: May 01, 2017, 17:11:22 »
I didn't want to call it "art" or "craft" in the title.

I'm in the midst of prepping to build my workshop. I have the space, 1.5 car garage on the new house. Still have to iron out a treaty between the wife and I over some space usage  ;D but should have ample room to get done what I want to.

I have the basic suite of tools and my first aim is to work with some black iron pipe and live edge maple planks/slabs to make shelving or bookshelves. I like the look and know a few folks who will want this sort of thing as a gift. I'll be going into Butterfly/Dutchman's joints, but I see templates for my router and I have a good set of chisels so we should be laughing there. Later, I'd like to get more advanced, but first thing is to get the thing set up to be workable!

I need to build a full scale workbench and was think L shaped for the corner of the space with a home for a hydration cooling medium, a sound generator, as well as some cabinets for paint and such. Racks to store/dry lumber is a must and will likely get homed with kayaks (her idea, not mine)

The big item, for me, is to build a rolling work table that can be set aside, or placed right smack in the middle of the place. Not sure on size yet, but am nearly certain I'll include a vise and some sort of clamping arrangement.

I also need a dust system and was thinking of this: http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=69841&cat=1,42401 It's cost effective and seems to be set up to do the job I want. I'll need it for a planer, sanders, router - not too much else I don't think. Since the work space will also be the finishing space, not to mention being attached to the house, dust is a concern.

If anyone has any ideas to share re: rolling work tables or fixed work benches I am all ears. She keeps telling me to go to Pinterest but I find myself rather Dispinterested.

I won't "show you mine" as far as tools go unless people are interested, or there is merit to talking about different tools and brands?

Cheers
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Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 17:16:16 »
I love this idea for a thread!!!!!!!

YOu are also an amazing woodworker!!  I use your Cutting board all the time, makes me feel like a chef!!!!

Hope I can contribute

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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2017, 17:40:06 »
What you might want to do is to create a utility table that can function as an outfeed table for your saw. That way you get the best of both worlds. There's tons of plans available for 2x4 construction. I would put cabinets and counters along one wall. I would also build rolling carts for some of your medium sized machines that you don't use all the time. You'll also want a metal paint locker for your volatile stuff. That way you only need to roll them out when you need. Horizontal wood storage is a good idea; you can put it up high in unused space. If you're familiar with SketchUp, then that's a good place to start planning. You can get the cyclone way cheaper off shore... if you want to that route, and you're prepared to wait. If you want to PM me, I can give you a list of my Youtube subscriptions that you can check out.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2017, 17:55:48 »

I also need a dust system and was thinking of this: http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=69841&cat=1,42401 It's cost effective and seems to be set up to do the job I want. I'll need it for a planer, sanders, router - not too much else I don't think. Since the work space will also be the finishing space, not to mention being attached to the house, dust is a concern.


Hi

This is truly a great idea for a thread.

I don't think much of the Dust Deputy as all it does is strip out larger particles sending the smaller dust on to the shop vac that you also have to buy. Why not just send everything to the shop vac? It's the small dust particles which are the bane of any indoor workshop and you might as well just invest in a high quality quality shop vac with a good filter that minimizes the small particles.

One thing that I've found indispensable is a good radial arm saw which lets me cut fairly good size pieces of wood. You'll probably still need a good compound mitre saw for fine work like trim etc. One thing I have been able to do without is a table saw because with a little planning you can get Lowes or Home Depot to do the big cuts for you when you buy the boards (also makes them fit better in your car to bring them home) Regardless you should plan a cutting enclosure for your saws to control the dust.

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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2017, 19:01:26 »
One site I've found to be awesome for ideas is instructables; they have a full category on just woodworking.  Full warning though, lots of really cool ideas for metalwork and all kinds of other DIY stuff, so can get down a rabbit hole easily.

http://www.instructables.com/tag/type-id/category-workshop/channel-woodworking/

They have a good variety of things that cover both high end and low budget kludges, and some ridiculously skilled creative people on there. Good spot to find all kinds of plans and ideas.

For using sketchup, there are lots of good tutorials on using it for woodworking such as this one;

http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/03/23/announcing-fine-woodworkings-google-sketchup-guide-for-woodworkers-the-basics

Great tool and easy to use.

Would be interested to see what setups people have for small spaces; I'm confined to an 8x8 area with shelving in my basement in the winter, and expand into the carport when I need more room.  I try to plan ahead to have as much large cuts done at HD etc when I can, and otherwise make jigs with a kludged worksurface for assembly.  Next project is making new kitchen cabinets though, so looking to make some kind of collapsible work bench if anyone has suggestions.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2017, 19:14:49 »
I second the recommendation for a work table that can double as an outfeed table for your table saw. I put mine together using the Kreg worktable system - basically, angle iron with adjustable height legs (which can be mounted on wheels. I mounted a top with an insert, which allows me to replace the smooth board insert when it gets worn. It will likely not allow you to mount a vice, unless you make a substantial top.

https://www.kregtool.com/store/c42/universal-bench-with-standard-height-legs/

The Dust Deputy will strip out a lot of the wood dust, leaving your shop vac filter much cleaner. I have a big Ridgid vac, and I also like to use the "paper bags" inside for collection which further spares the filter.

Offline sidemount

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2017, 19:26:12 »
Love having a table that works with my table saw. Also from the kreg website, the kreg jigs are amazing. I love the pocket holes done with them.

I think not so much the saws but the blades I have for them make such a huge difference. I have a couple of very fine tooth blades for both my table and compound mitre saw. Made some sweet tables with them.

My next project is a king size head board.

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2017, 06:33:26 »
Awesome responses. I don't mean to make this my personal thread, hopefully there's more and more stuff on the go forward.

WRT dust: I have the shop vac and have used it for my sanders. The saw is on a dolly system and so I'll just use it in the driveway (when she ain't raining). The big reason for a dust system is the thickness planer, and Dust Deputy seemed to be the way to go for it. I do not have the money, or the space, to go with a higher end system. But I am open to other ideas I might not have considered - like buying offshore.

The nature of what I'll be doing, for now, will see a definite use for the table saw. I certainly wish I could have the hardware store do my cuts, and would consider that for more refined projects in the future. On that note, the plan, as it stands now, is to use the rolling table as an outfeed table for the saw - so same height. Far as a vise for it goes, I was thinking of a Wilton, so side mount, for that table, and something sturdier on the bench. I really like the idea of being able to replace the top on the table, so that will come to the fore.

I am already thinking of going away from L shaped and just using the back wall for the fixed bench - that's free up space to be negotiated over and the only thing I'd use the jog for would be a drill press, but that is a small portable unit that can easily live on the floor and move to the table.

All floor based tools with the exception of the bandsaw for right now (and I just haven't figured out a solution yet) will be moveable. Table saw, planer.

My toolkit is pretty half decent. Though I was pressed and had to go for a cheaper option with a chop saw... >:( but that's what Kijiji is for! I had a deck to build and my old Delta crapped out so I went with a Skil, I think (I'm not home right now, hence the time to think about this crap!) Anyway, it's my one regrettable purchase (besides going corded for a recip saw and not battery operated) and so I will likely get a radial arm. Thinking Rigid due to their warranty being back by Home Depot.

WRT blades, I now purchase Diablo for everything. My Dad had good luck with them and I saw a difference right away.

I have a Kreg jig and have loved the possibilities it opens up. I used it to build some deck tables last year - overkill, but fun learning!

First priority is destroying a shelving system the previous owner has in the garage and getting it to pristine space. Next is making sure I have power everywhere I want/need it for the foreseeable future. Then comes workbench. After that I can look at storage and finally the table.

Thanks for all of the feedback!

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2017, 09:13:35 »
I should clarify something:

One of the reasons the Dust Deputy, or similar, appeals to me is that I have the Shop-Vac, and I can use the particles for fire starting. If it works really well, I may find use for maple shavings in my smoker - though I'd be wary at first in case I get doghair or something in there :-X
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2017, 10:28:07 »
Scott:

I have a Dust Deputy that I paired with the recycled central vac system I use in the garage for woodworking and I have been very satisfied with the combination. My old central vac get clogged a lot less frequently now. And for wood storage, I acquired from Canadian Tire a few extra tire storage racks: I installed them in line with one another near the top of the back wall and, when not in use, they fold away. When I need to store wood, I lower just the number I need for the length of wood I store and as they don't have flat surfaces to get in the way, the wood stays nice and dry with good air circulation around it.

As for FJAG, I don't know what type of woodworking you concentrate on, but in my case I do a lot of cabinetry work (custom built the kitchen - twice by now - with complex highly decorative woodwork on the doors, drawers and edges. I don't know how I could have done it without a high end table saw, that doubled as a dado or groove maker and moulding head, or to make tapered cuts on legs of tables and cabinets. To each his own - but I for one can't live without it.  :nod: 

Offline Big Spoon

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2017, 10:37:40 »
I will say that this thread makes me feel insignificant in my woodworking space. I have been relegated to having only an outdoor workshop which makes me extremely weather dependent and really only allows for jobs that can be completed in a short time or are small enough that i can move them inside.

But the positive side of this is that I find woodworking a great way to relieve stress at the end of a hard day/week.

Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2017, 11:26:32 »
An assembly table that can double as an out feed comes in handy, you can also make your own bench vice using pipe clamps.
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2017, 11:30:19 »
You can also make your own cyclone mine works alright only the smallest particles make it to the vac, a washable good quality filter for your vac is essential.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Tz_9HDW3Hg

Edit: to add a link
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 11:33:35 by Gizmo 421 »
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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2017, 11:49:59 »
I will say that this thread makes me feel insignificant in my woodworking space. I have been relegated to having only an outdoor workshop which makes me extremely weather dependent and really only allows for jobs that can be completed in a short time or are small enough that i can move them inside.

But the positive side of this is that I find woodworking a great way to relieve stress at the end of a hard day/week.

Dude, I had been in a cramped basement room and doing "dirty" work outside on nice days for the last six years - all in time, or with imagination!

An assembly table that can double as an out feed comes in handy, you can also make your own bench vice using pipe clamps.

Holy frig, THAT is why I started this thread! That is an utterly brilliant idea for the vice!

With that, let me explain my own experience a little: very much an "as needed" tool buyer. I usually only purchase when I can absorb the cost through a project - which makes her happy. I have been tinkering with smaller projects for years now, but doing all in a very analog fashion. So seeing things like using pipe clamps, which I have a shitload of, for a vice is something I will bank on. Hopefully more of that experienced based info coming for this thread, for all sorts of other ideas!

I also like the idea of making my own dust separator. Might just go with that.

Cheers
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2017, 12:07:45 »
Totally forgot to give credit for the bench vice to Jay Bates
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeprY3nwH9w
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2017, 12:15:46 »
Scott:

As for FJAG, I don't know what type of woodworking you concentrate on, but in my case I do a lot of cabinetry work (custom built the kitchen - twice by now - with complex highly decorative woodwork on the doors, drawers and edges. I don't know how I could have done it without a high end table saw, that doubled as a dado or groove maker and moulding head, or to make tapered cuts on legs of tables and cabinets. To each his own - but I for one can't live without it.  :nod:

By far the most that I've done is construction level (including building a 300 sq ft extension to my last house). Most of my finishing work has been in the way of doors, baseboards, moulding etc. My last project was probably the one closest to finishing cabinetry in that we bought an old hutch and buffet combo at the local "antiques" shop, totally tore it apart ripped off all the curlicues and ornate googads and rebuilt it into a much more modern, separated unit.

My father in law was a great furniture builder and I know his table saw, jointer and planer were the basic tools that he lived by.

Just as an aside, Gizmo 421's post has me totally rethinking that cyclone system. I'm still pretty sure I won't buy a Dust Deputy but the hand made one looks like the way I'll go.

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2017, 12:19:19 »
My father in law was a great furniture builder and I know his table saw, jointer and planer were the basic tools that he lived by.

My junior high shop teacher would agree. I do, too. The jointer is a ways off tho!

Quote
Just as an aside, Gizmo 421's post has me totally rethinking that cyclone system. I'm still pretty sure I won't buy a Dust Deputy but the hand made one looks like the way I'll go.

:cheers:

Hands down one of the single most helpful posts I have ever benefited from here. I can't wait to get all the other work done so I can implement this.

And those pipe clamps are going to be a part of the table. In fact, I see no reason to set two sides (long and end) up just the same. Completely brilliant.
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2017, 12:24:57 »
I have only returned to woodworking within the last year after being away from it for an extended period find I have to relearn most everything projects I have been working on lately are Yardzee dice and Pet Leash Hangers, I have to agree that it is very relaxing after work to go out to the shop and make some sawdust.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2017, 12:28:57 »
We bought a couple of the Honeywell AirGenius3 Air Cleaners for our house. After we set up a workshop in the basement, we discovered a need to place them in the basement to keep the dust down. What I like the most about the air purifier are the permanent air filters. At the end of the day, we just have to wash, rinse, and air dry the filters overnight. We also have a good quality shop vac.
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Offline sidemount

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2017, 12:45:09 »
My new fav thread haha


Is it just me or does anyone else just love the smell of sawdust when you are working.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2017, 12:47:59 »
Freaking dust can be a huge problem for myself especially in winter when I can't open the workshop doors, I'm a big fan of build your own if you can so I used a modified version of this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5csWbjg5w4w to build an air cleaner with an old 16" fan I had kicking around I usually use a standard furnace filter for the primary and a MERV 8 or 11 for the secondary (the plans were modified to fit my house furnace filter size.

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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2017, 17:09:58 »
My new fav thread haha


Is it just me or does anyone else just love the smell of sawdust when you are working.

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No doubt the smell of wood being worked on is great, but Big Spoon hit on one of the two main reasons we do woodworking: It relieves stress like nothing else; the second reason of course being that it gives us an excuse to get away from the Commander Home Fleet that she can't argue with because the loves the results.  ;D

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2017, 17:12:48 »
That fan idea is the bomb. I'll consider that once further down the road. The wife will always love an idea that eradicates dust.

Now: any ideas specific to a thickness planer? You guys with the cyclones, do you use it for planing? Or just wing the stuff into a box?
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2017, 17:55:55 »
No doubt the smell of wood being worked on is great, but Big Spoon hit on one of the two main reasons we do woodworking: It relieves stress like nothing else; the second reason of course being that it gives us an excuse to get away from the Commander Home Fleet that she can't argue with because the loves the results.  ;D
Haha aint that the truth. I also love when 9er domestic makes a specific request and I use it as an excuse to get some new tools :D



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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2017, 18:44:50 »
Haha aint that the truth. I also love when 9er domestic makes a specific request and I use it as an excuse to get some new tools :D



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I'm reasonably certain I've got the go ahead to buy a press brake and try and make metal kitchen cabinets.  Toying with the idea, but essentially would bend sheet to make some facing for the drawers and doors with some kind of wood core (plywood? project pine?).  May double it over on the edges to get a front and back but not sure how clean the corners would be.  I think some trial and error is probably the best bet, but always liked the old metal kitchen cabinets they had in the 30s and 40s, and this seems like fun.

Failing that, planning on standard wooden cabinets and drawers, probably in some kind of arts and crafts style with stained glass for the larger doors.

Incidentally, stained glass is surprisingly relaxing as well; also have plans for some large light boxes with custom stained glass panels, so combines both basic woodworking and stained glass.

Personally I've had good luck with a good chop saw, power saw, drill and some basic hand tools.  Over the years I've picked up a contractors table saw and a router with a whack of bits from kijiji for steals, as well as a reasonable collection of clamps etc, but nothing fancy.  Brands are funny in that there is a wide variety in the same brand.  The makita power saw I bought happens to have a motor made in Japan and is a pleasure to use; almost identical model with a motor from china is a bit of a lemon from reviews online, so it's hard to judge by brand alone now.  Most of my hand tools are mastercraft, and they are more than good enough for what I use them for.  If you do some reading, people manage some remarkable things with very basic set ups and a lot of creative jigs.

Another good option for tools is renting them if you have a specific project.  Home depots have big selections, and there are lots of other good places in most cities.  I have found it a great option for getting some of the more expensive tools (like a good random orbit sander, wet tile saws, big sliding mitre compound saws) for something specific where I may not want to buy, and you can try out all kinds of different brands as well.  Doesn't make sense if you use it a lot, but if you are space constrained or not sure what you want it's a good option.  You can also try to find some of the 'maker' shops in your area or woodworking places; you can get memberships and sometimes have access to awesome equipment like large industrial planers.

First step though, I got lost looking through the instructables site and found this design for a collapsible workbench;
https://www.instructables.com/id/Collapsible-Workbench/
I think I would make it larger and modify it to use some bolts , but the idea of it is pretty good.  There are lots of other examples there for interesting ideas to start with from people that also have limited space.

This is also pretty wild, need to try it some time to add some extra details to the finish;
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-I-Make-Cool-Metal-Inlays/
Might not be the most efficient way to do it, but again, interesting read and good starting point for a concept.  (This is what I meant by getting lost in rabbit holes though)