Author Topic: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case  (Read 52898 times)

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Offline Jed

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #625 on: March 14, 2019, 22:56:42 »
Ref: Iacabucci.

W.T.F!

If the Chronicle has this correct, a former Supreme Court Judge is, essentially, blackmailing the current PM.

What kind of nothern Banana republic has Canada become?

Wow! Sounds like Kabuki theatre.
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Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #626 on: March 14, 2019, 23:06:09 »
Certainly puts the whole " hey Jodi, let's get a second opinion from a retired supreme court judge" line into serious question. The whole frigging crap house is about to come down.
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #627 on: March 14, 2019, 23:14:20 »
Given the discussions about buying judicial opinions and placing op-eds I think this part of the Buffalo Chronicle article bears repeating:

Quote
Iacobucci is a trusted confidant of Canada’s ruling Liberal Party establishment and has received high-profile appointments by federal and provincial Liberal governments.

Iacobucci sits on the Board of Directors of Torstar, the company that publishes The Toronto Star, The Hamilton Spectator, GTA Today, The Niagara Review, iPolitics, and a series of smaller newspapers.  He formerly served as Chairman.  The Toronto Star, in particular, has earned a reputation for left-leaning opinion pages and reliably favorable coverage of Liberal politicians. 
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #628 on: March 14, 2019, 23:54:55 »
Deleted by self for possible contravention of site guidelines.

« Last Edit: March 15, 2019, 14:37:45 by Chris Pook »
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Offline MilEME09

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #629 on: March 15, 2019, 01:10:41 »
For more of the same read the article on the AOPS in the National Post.

Privicy violations and Irving threatening legal action for a story not even written yet. Corruption in a nut shell here, this whole thing need a a public inquiry and a temporary ban on the liberal party from running in am election for 4 years.
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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #630 on: March 15, 2019, 01:43:14 »
Just a little digression on Iacabucci.

Before becoming a Supreme Court Justice, Iacabucci was one of the most highly respected and talented corporate lawyers in Canada and as Dean of the law school at UofT and was a Deputy Minister of Justice for several years. I have no idea what his political leanings are but he was nominated for the SCC by Brian Mulroney a conservative in the days when political affiliation mattered.

After his retirement he took on the role as counsel to the Torys law firm and has been retained by numerous agencies to act on their behalf including several non-Liberal governments.

He's tough, bright, highly experienced and ethical.

In the legal community, conflicts of interest matter; a lot. I personally wouldn't be prepared to throw any aspersions on him based on a flimsy puff piece like that of the Buffalo Chronicle which is a little long on rumour and a little short on sources.

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Offline Petard

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #631 on: March 15, 2019, 02:06:11 »
Just a little digression on Iacabucci.

He's tough, bright, highly experienced and ethical.

In the legal community, conflicts of interest matter; a lot. I personally wouldn't be prepared to throw any aspersions on him based on a flimsy puff piece like that of the Buffalo Chronicle which is a little long on rumour and a little short on sources.

 :2c:

To think he wouldn't of been trying to influence things for his client, SNC, would be naive.

So far, a number of other well informed legal experts have weighed in, and none support the idea SNC should have been offered a DPA based on economic outcomes. Yet considering economic outcomes was exactly what the Clerk of the Privy council was getting at, and supposedly was why he mentioned Iacabucci not being any shrinking violet to emphasize the point.  The government continues to cling to that idea.  The implication was Iacabucci's legal opinion, biased as it would be for his client, should outweigh that of the AG and the PPSC.

Offline Tcm621

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #632 on: March 15, 2019, 10:38:58 »
To think he wouldn't of been trying to influence things for his client, SNC, would be naive.

So far, a number of other well informed legal experts have weighed in, and none support the idea SNC should have been offered a DPA based on economic outcomes. Yet considering economic outcomes was exactly what the Clerk of the Privy council was getting at, and supposedly was why he mentioned Iacabucci not being any shrinking violet to emphasize the point.  The government continues to cling to that idea.  The implication was Iacabucci's legal opinion, biased as it would be for his client, should outweigh that of the AG and the PPSC.

Lobbying for this client is kind of his job. As long as he didn't break any rules, it is incumbent on the government not to be a bunch of pansy's who bow down to a high powered lawyer.

The blackmailing rumour is frightening though.

Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #633 on: March 15, 2019, 11:17:35 »
Pffft. Making threats is part of litigation. They just can’t be idle or unlawful threats. Iacabucci wouldn’t blackmail anyone directly or indirectly. He’s required to be a strong and courageous advocate for his client, and he’s got a real winner for a client. It’s why he’s trying to make a deal, he probably forsee’s a conviction and his client wants an alternative. 

I do agree that the firepower demonstration of political influence is disturbing.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2019, 11:24:59 by Cloud Cover »
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #634 on: March 15, 2019, 11:40:09 »
Loachman:

I don't know if you picked up on this one -

Quote
The chair of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Working Group on Bribery said today Jody-Wilson Raybould's testimony on SNC-Lavalin compelled the group to speak out on allegations of political interference in the criminal case against the Quebec engineering firm.

"Allegations which were expressed there immediately raised all alarms sounding in the working group on bribery and that's why we started the debate," said Drago Kos in an interview with CBC News Network's Power & Politics on Wednesday.

Quote
Trudeau has acknowleged, however, that he asked her to "revisit" her decision to not negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin that would have allowed it to avoid a trial, saying he was concerned about the loss of 9,000 jobs that might follow the company going under.

Pointing to article 5 in OECD's Anti-Bribery Convention, Kos said national economic interest is not something the prosecution should consider when deciding whether to proceed to trial.

"I think we would all agree that only the merits of the case should be taken into consideration and nothing else," he said.

Kos said the working group is waiting to see the results of investigations by the House justice committee and the ethics commissioner — but Canada will still have to answer for these allegations before the OECD.

"It will not be just decisions of both of your committees," said Kos.

The OECD has sent Canada a letter outlining its concerns.

Kos said Canada will face a 'phase four' OECD review — an evaluation of Canada's compliance with the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention by experts from two member countries and the secretariat of the working group. Canada will be expected to reply to the report within 24 months, offering its response to the OECD's observations and recommendations.

"This does not go very quick," said Kos. He didn't detail possible consequences for Canada in the event its response to the phase four report is found wanting, beyond saying that the OECD would want to see "measures" introduced that would prevent political interference with prosecutions.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/powerandpolitics/wilson-raybould-snc-lavalin-trudeau-oecd-kos-1.5055261

It isn't just a local matter or an election matter.  It is a matter of national reputation and won't disappear quickly.  Now..... about that seat on the Security Council.....
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Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #635 on: March 15, 2019, 12:03:03 »
Just a little digression on Iacabucci.

Before becoming a Supreme Court Justice, Iacabucci was one of the most highly respected and talented corporate lawyers in Canada and as Dean of the law school at UofT and was a Deputy Minister of Justice for several years. I have no idea what his political leanings are but he was nominated for the SCC by Brian Mulroney a conservative in the days when political affiliation mattered.

After his retirement he took on the role as counsel to the Torys law firm and has been retained by numerous agencies to act on their behalf including several non-Liberal governments.

He's tough, bright, highly experienced and ethical.

In the legal community, conflicts of interest matter; a lot. I personally wouldn't be prepared to throw any aspersions on him based on a flimsy puff piece like that of the Buffalo Chronicle which is a little long on rumour and a little short on sources.

 :2c:

Political leaning and affiliations among certain of our politicians is somewhat of a dubious matter, especially if they have a higher calling. Brian Mulroney, in my mind, was never a conservative. Up until the last few years, he was considered by many as the worst PM we've ever had. I don't see the fact that he was in the Conservative party, has any weight in the argument. Mulroney was considered by many to be the right hand man of Paul Desmarais, his mentor, the owner of Power Corp. Do you leave a spot like that to enter the uncertain world of politics? Not without lots and lots of backing.

The chart is almost 15 years old, I'll grant. Many here will decide it's fake news because it's originally from Levant and the Western Standard. It doesn't change history though. You'll find the same connections, if you delve deep enough into the individuals listed.

What it does show, is the way many politicians are intertwined with, probably, Canada's biggest corporation. Party affiliations be damned. There are leaders from every party, either fed or prov, working at PC. Before and after their political careers. A corporation that can influence employment, fuels, food, finances, media, insurance and other aspects of our everyday lives. A company that makes Prime Ministers. If you don't think their influence is that great, read about the oil for food scandal in the Middle East. It is the very small tip of the iceberg.
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.

Online Brad Sallows

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #636 on: March 15, 2019, 12:31:08 »
"Will no one rid us of this turbulent AG?"

It's not difficult to apply pressure in the powerful circles in which people know how to listen between the lines.
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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #637 on: March 15, 2019, 13:05:46 »
Prepping for bigger/better things, perhaps?  This from JWR's page (PDF also attached in case link doesn't work for you)...
Quote
March 14, 2019

Dear Constituents of Vancouver Granville,

Over the past three and a half years, it has been my greatest privilege to serve you as your Member of Parliament. With your support, guidance, and participation we have achieved important things – and, of course, there is important work yet to be done. Currently, as has been publicly reported, I intend to stand for re-election as the Liberal candidate for the 2019 federal election.

Recent events have been a wake-up call for many across the country. These matters are still unfolding, and further clarity and information is needed. As in other places around the globe, our democratic institutions and norms – including the rule of law and prosecutorial independence – are under pressure. Collectively, and as individuals, we are challenged to respond.

Unsurprisingly, some responses to this challenge – including from some politicians and commentators – suggest this is simply the way things are, and the way things will always be.

This old, cynical view is wrong. We need never resign ourselves to the excuse that “this is just the way things are done.” Our country is built on a belief that we can, and must, continually do better. We will never be perfect, but we must always be striving to strengthen the foundations of diversity, inclusion, equality, and justice. When we are not doing that, we have truly lost our way.

This is why Canadians from coast to coast to coast have so inspired me in recent weeks. I found myself in a situation I never expected to be in. I was just doing my job, and I did not expect it to become a national focus. But you were paying attention – and with good reason – because this matter is serious, and some questions remain unanswered. And – importantly – your responses have motivated and intensified courageous action about doing politics differently.

Being different is a theme intimately connected to my work in politics. In asking you to elect me as your representative, I pledged to you that I would strive – as best I could – to act differently than we had increasingly been accustomed.

Before 2015 I had never been involved in federal or provincial politics, and had never been a member of a political party. My leadership experience before running to be your Member of Parliament had been in the Indigenous world, advocating for transformation in relations with Indigenous peoples and to do politics differently – less partisan and more open. As many of you know, in my cultural teachings we strive to work through consensus. While there are diverse views, tensions, and challenges, we do not entrench those in political parties, and we often frown on personal ambition. I have tried to bring this approach to Ottawa and will continue to do so.

During these recent events you have taught me so much about what a changed politics means. I have received over 10, 000 emails, texts, phone calls, cards, and letters from around the country expressing the vision, desire, and passion of Canadians to effect real and transformative change.

You are the true leaders who reject the increasing culture of conflict, empty partisanship, and cynical games that are far too common, and you are committed to building a culture of ever-greater collaboration, truth-seeking, and principled service for the well-being of Canada and all Canadians. Thank you.

I stand with you. Our collective goal is to encourage, support, and advance all lines of action that will help transform a political culture from being self-serving to service-oriented on behalf of all Canadians.

Beyond partisanship, spin, and image, there lies a politics of change that is driven forward by galvanizing our core values – regardless of political stripe – into concrete laws, policies and actions that support Canada as an ever-advancing society.

I look forward to continuing to advance this work with you, and with Canadians across the country. Let us continue to be engaged, stay true to principles and values we hold dear, and uphold each other as we all work to strengthen our communities and our institutions, knowing that each of our voices counts.

Thank you again for your outreach.

Respectfully,

Puglaas

Jody Wilson-Raybould, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

Member of Parliament for Vancouver Granville
Feel free to read the tea leaves there ...
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #638 on: March 15, 2019, 13:44:40 »
The events in NZ are a blessing for JT, they will double down on C-71 and use it to empower Blairs recommendations for further restrictions.

Offline 211RadOp

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #639 on: March 15, 2019, 14:01:35 »
Quote
Liberal MP who led committee shutdown denies coverup, says it's time for 'shift' in SNC-Lavalin debate

Francis Drouin says he sees no reason to recall Jody Wilson-Raybould to committee

Kathleen Harris · CBC News · Posted: Mar 14, 2019 12:13 PM ET | Last Updated: 22 minutes ago

The Liberal MP who triggered the sudden adjournment of an emergency meeting of the Commons justice committee Wednesday insists there's been no attempt by the government to cover up the SNC-Lavalin affair, and says it's time to turn the page on the controversy.

Francis Drouin suggested the opposition Conservative and NDP members were playing politics by calling the meeting during March break, since a session to determine next steps had already been scheduled for Mar. 19.

The opposition members forced Wednesday's meeting to debate a motion to invite former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould back before the committee to testify for a second time about what she claims was a concerted effort by high-level government officials, including people in the Prime Minister's Office, to interfere with her decision to allow bribery charges against SNC-Lavalin to proceed to trial.

Drouin — who is not a member of the committee and was filling in for another MP who was unavailable — said he believes it's unnecessary to bring Wilson-Raybould back. He said she can provide the committee with a written statement and noted she's testified before the committee for nearly four hours already.

"I think I've heard enough," he said in an interview with CBC Radio's Ottawa Morning. "Ms. Wilson-Raybould has said, in response to Elizabeth May and Nathan Cullen, that nothing illegal was committed, nothing criminal was committed. So now the conversation has to shift between whether or not the attorney general and the minister of justice, those roles should be split."

More at link

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/drouin-liberal-snc-justice-committee-1.5056070
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #640 on: March 15, 2019, 18:15:18 »
I'm not inclined to "shift focus" yet but Conrad Black has an interesting take on JWR.

Quote
Conrad Black: SNC-Lavalin is a sideshow to the real Wilson-Raybould issue
Throughout her tenure as justice minister, she tied the government’s hands in responding to suits from Aboriginal organizations

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/conrad-black-snc-lavalin-is-a-sideshow-to-the-real-wilson-raybould-issue?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR2BdMM2bjXcFl85j4oDHALMeelvAedRZ7DchhNAfvQa6ALGlVv_Cu_qLCY#Echobox=1552679080

Funny thing about people.  They don't have to be wrong all the time.  Occasionally they can be right as well.

And sometimes they do the right things for the wrong reasons.

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Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #641 on: March 15, 2019, 22:09:06 »
I'm thinking this probably fits best here.
https://www.spencerfernando.com/2019/03/15/facing-possibility-of-rcmp-probe-trudeau-his-staff-are-hiring-lawyers/?fbclid=IwAR0kwdfsFPU17ccRqLX4kKptoxeXOrBWgslIaBc8mRsUTGwDi9FhAlH1L3M

Quote
    Facing Possibility Of RCMP Probe, Trudeau & His Staff Are Hiring Lawyers
SpencerFernando
March 15, 20190   
Trudeau Scandal Response

Report indicates how worried the PMO is about the continuing scandal.

The Globe & Mail is reporting that Justin Trudeau and top PMO officials have hired private lawyers, as they face the possibility of an RCMP probe.

    “Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and senior officials in his office have retained outside legal counsel in case of an RCMP investigation into allegations of political interference in the criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin Group.

    Mr. Trudeau’s communications director, Cameron Ahmad, told The Globe and Mail on Friday that Treasury Board rules allow for hiring of outside counsel when government officials are either sued, threatened with a suit, charged with an offence or under threat of being named in a legal action.”

    Additionally, “A senior government official, who was not authorized to speak publicly about the matter, said an outside law firm has been hired to represent Mr. Trudeau, and another law firm will handle staff in the Prime Minister’s Office. The second law firm will act on behalf of Mr. Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford, Quebec adviser Mathieu Bouchard and senior adviser Elder Marques, the official said.”

At this point neither the government nor the RCMP have said whether an investigation is taking place.

However, the opposition has been pushing for an investigation, especially considering how corrupted the ‘justice’ committee has become.

Without an independent investigation free of political influence, Canadians can’t get the truth, because the Trudeau Liberals are now in full cover-up mode.

Additionally, the fact that the PMO is retaining lawyers shows how big of a scandal this is. After all, why would they be lawyering up for a story that’s ‘false?’

Spencer Fernando   [ /quote]
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #642 on: March 16, 2019, 10:10:16 »
Admiral Norman, who is probably Innocent,was refused legal aid at government expense.
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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #643 on: March 16, 2019, 11:04:56 »
Admiral Norman, who is probably Innocent,was refused legal aid at government expense.

Given the nature of the alleged offense, not a chance he would be indemnified at crown expense.

I’ve received legal coverage under the same policy. It’s intended to cover employees/agents of the crown who in the good faith exercise of their duties and up on the wrong side of legal action, which happens quite a bit.

This is governed by the Treasury Board Secrerariat policy on Legal Assistance and Indemnification.

“6.1.5 Three basic eligibility criteria: In considering Crown servants for legal assistance or indemnification, determining whether the Crown servant:

- acted in good faith;
- did not act against the interests of the Crown; and
- acted within the scope of their duties or course of employment with respect to the acts or omissions giving rise to the request.”

So, without opining on the merits or lack thereof in this particular prosecution, *if* the nature of an alleged offense is such that it falls outside the scope of duties or was not in good faith or was against the interests of the crown, legal assistance won’t be provided.

I’m adding this only for the sake of clarity on that point, since I’ve had the dubious fortune of experiencing it firsthand.
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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #644 on: March 16, 2019, 11:28:24 »
It seems to me that much of that can only be tested at trial.

I can understand the accused having to reimburse costs if found guilty.  I have difficulty with bureaucrats deciding the merits of a case in advance of a case being tried.
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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #645 on: March 16, 2019, 11:48:03 »
I have difficulty with bureaucrats deciding the merits of a case in advance of a case being tried.

Why not?  The PM did exactly that.  Leadership by example.
Train like your life depends on it.  Some day, it may.

Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #646 on: March 16, 2019, 11:56:14 »
No different than when the Crown comes after legal gun owners. The Crown expects a foregone conclusion that all guns will be seized and the legal owner ruined for life. Occasionally, they get suprised.
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #647 on: March 16, 2019, 12:04:24 »
Given the nature of the alleged offense, not a chance he would be indemnified at crown expense.

I’ve received legal coverage under the same policy. It’s intended to cover employees/agents of the crown who in the good faith exercise of their duties and up on the wrong side of legal action, which happens quite a bit.

This is governed by the Treasury Board Secrerariat policy on Legal Assistance and Indemnification.

“6.1.5 Three basic eligibility criteria: In considering Crown servants for legal assistance or indemnification, determining whether the Crown servant:

- acted in good faith;
- did not act against the interests of the Crown; and
- acted within the scope of their duties or course of employment with respect to the acts or omissions giving rise to the request.”

So, without opining on the merits or lack thereof in this particular prosecution, *if* the nature of an alleged offense is such that it falls outside the scope of duties or was not in good faith or was against the interests of the crown, legal assistance won’t be provided.

I’m adding this only for the sake of clarity on that point, since I’ve had the dubious fortune of experiencing it firsthand.

I've had some experience with that as well albeit as counsel for an individual who was given a s.13 notice under the Inquiries Act during the Somalia Inquiry. ss 12-13 read as follows:

Quote
Parties may employ counsel

12 The commissioners may allow any person whose conduct is being investigated under this Act, and shall allow any person against whom any charge is made in the course of an investigation, to be represented by counsel.

R.S., c. I-13, s. 12.
Marginal note:Notice to persons charged

13 No report shall be made against any person until reasonable notice has been given to the person of the charge of misconduct alleged against him and the person has been allowed full opportunity to be heard in person or by counsel.

R.S., c. I-13, s. 13.

In effect a s. 13 notice for the Somalia Inquiry indicated to the witnesses that there is a likelihood that they will be found to have been involved on some misconduct that would reflect badly against them in the report and which might lead to some charges (although several of those given notices had already been tried by court martial).

Because there were so many of them it was not possible to furnish crown counsel (as well the crown was counsel for the inquiry) and therefore they were all directed to get outside private counsel which were paid for out of the public purse.

While there is a substantive difference to being charged in a civilian court and being a witness under the Inquiry Act, the basic character of the matter is the same: there is some form of alleged misconduct involved performed during the course of employment and a consequence serious enough that the member requires the aid of legal counsel.

I have trouble distinguishing the good faith element when comparing "negligent performance of duty" or "torture" or "unlawfully causing bodily harm" or even "murder" (as were the misconduct in the Somalia Inquiry) with "revealing cabinet confidences". If anything, IMHO, the allegations against Norman are much more likely to be defensible on the grounds of good faith than some of the Somalia ones.

To me the decision not to provide Norman with financial support seems arbitrary and mean spirited (and regrettably, consistent with how the Government seems often to be working these days.).

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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #648 on: March 16, 2019, 14:18:27 »
http://nationalpost.pressreader.com/national-post-latest-edition/20190316

Sorry Liberals – the ‘ jobs’ excuse won’t fly - National Post - 16 Mar 2019 - Rex Murphy

Whoever is masterminding the Liberal response to the SNC-Lavalin scandal is confusing the anchor and the life-jacket. To be clear, the life-jacket is the one that keeps you afloat … the anchor is the heavy thing. The justice committee Liberals — who are obviously not mariners — met Wednesday only to shut the committee down for a week, to stall on allowing Jody Wilson-Raybould back to complete her testimony, giving every indication possible that they weren’t really very interested in hearing from her at all anymore.

There is nothing opposition MPs could have done more effectively to juice up an already highly-charged saga than the five Liberals’ blatant and televised amputation of what a committee named justice ought to be doing. Which is to hear from the central character in this story — free to speak fully and without the restraint of various privileges — the full account of why she left cabinet, and why another senior minister, Jane Philpott, felt conscience-bound to leave in solidarity with her.

The same committee has also killed opposition efforts to call Justin Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford, PMO advisers Elder Marques and Mathieu Bouchard, the former chief of staff to Ms. Wilson-Raybould, Jessica Prince, and notably the only figure who really has the whole story, the prime minister himself. There is something in the Liberals’ behaviour touchingly reminiscent of the classic line from Dr. Strangelove: “Gentlemen, you can’t fight in here. This is the War Room.” Committee chairman Anthony Housefather: “Witnesses? You can’t call for witnesses here. This is the justice committee.”

That’s the tactic they’ve decided on. Close it down. Leave the full story untold. Use process to obscure truth. There’s a morbid irony in using control of the justice committee as the instrument to deny the function of the justice committee. If this were the Harper years they’d call it muzzling. The mores change with the tempores, I suppose. The first response to the charges of pressuring the attorney general on behalf of SNC-Lavalin was clear denial. Mr. Trudeau: “The allegations in the Globe story are false.”

They more or less dropped that one and moved on to a more slippery rationale. Yes, there was pressure, all those meetings, the PMO and Gerald Butts, the finance minister’s aide, the clerk of the Privy Council, JWR’s one-to-one with Mr. Trudeau, but it was good pressure, because, you know, SNC-Lavalin employed so many people, and they had to save 9,000 jobs. This was tacitly something of an admission, a conditional one. It said: If we did put the heat on, if we did — slightly — overstep our bounds, well, as Mr. Trudeau emphasized at least a hundred times, “we will always fight to protect Canadian jobs.” We’re the Trudeau government. Jobs are what we are. We protect Canadian jobs. We may have acted badly but our hearts were job pure.

This newfound emphasis on jobs was a strange sunrise, puzzling to very many, and a veritable revelation out in certain Western provinces. A social-justice warrior government, cast in the deepest shade of green, touting feminism, diversity, carbon taxes, equity for all, globalist in aspiration — was suddenly a Jobs First government. Now there was a costume change. You’re in the theatre, you’ve watched the first three acts of Hamlet, the curtain opens on Act 4, and it’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. (Enter Puck, with his cover letter and resumé.)

Building pipelines involves jobs. The oilsands involve jobs — tens of thousands of jobs. Northern Gateway involved jobs. The Energy East pipeline involved jobs. Oil companies cancelling projects involved jobs. The flight of headquarters from Calgary involved jobs. The still-stalled Trans Mountain pipeline involves jobs. The most massive jobs hit in the Canadian economy, involving an entire industry, did not get 1/100 the prime attention that a single company, with a dubious reputation, already sanctioned outside Canada, and under investigation within, received. Who can seriously believe the “we value jobs line?”

Did they hound and set siege to the National Energy Board with the same ferocity and frequency the attorney general was subjected to for the benefit of SNC-Lavalin? Was the dark lord of the Privy Council on the phone to the head of the NEB reminding the board that there were massive jobs involved in all these impeded and cancelled projects? Seeking to slacken the regulations, speed up the process, get the approvals out pronto?
Were they strong-arming the B.C. premier to lower his opposition to Trans Mountain? Were they back-dooring the legal system to hold off on nuisance lawsuits from environmentalists because … so many valuable Canadian jobs were at stake? Were they fighting the octopus green lobby’s relentless campaign against Canadian energy, speaking out in international forums against its propaganda? The answer to all these questions and a hundred similar ones is No.

A single company, SNC-Lavalin, owned all the machinery and might of the PMO and the prime minister himself. In contrast, an entire national industry with employees across the full spread of the country, was left to languish. Or worse, be entangled in new regulations, staring down Bill C-69, burdened by new and useless socalled carbon taxes, and hearing the prime minister declare, somewhat in exasperation, “we can’t shut down the oilsands tomorrow.” I fear in the light of how employment in the energy sector has been valued that the “jobs are us” line is a bird that will not fly.

Note to Post readers: Two (or more) people may experience this column differently, but diversity is our strength.

THE OILSANDS INVOLVE JOBS — TENS OF THOUSANDS OF JOBS.
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Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Alleged PMO obstruction in SNC Lavalin case
« Reply #649 on: March 16, 2019, 14:36:12 »
Like I say. Construction workers don't lose jobs. They move to the work and stay employed. The job losses should be contained to the suits. No biggie there.
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.