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Armouries

Kirkhill

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Denmark is a country of 5.8 million. It can organize 46,651 volunteers in support of the military.

In Canada's case, with 38 million that would equate to 301,379 volunteers

Like every other voluntary group they get varying levels of participation with about 30% considered to be reliable, or Active and the remainder considered to be a Reserve entity that would probably turnout in the event of a flood or an invasion when daily routine is disrupted.

10% are considered to be sufficiently reliable that they are assigned military support tasks and are issued operational kit that they keep with them at home. That includes rifles.

300,000 volunteers available for emergencies, vetted, minimally trained.
100,000 volunteers available for occasional callout for special events
30,000 reliable, operational volunteers

With 150 armouries that would result in 2,000 volunteers on the rolls of each armoury, capable of producing up to 700 volunteers for special events and 200 armed, operational volunteers to support local forces with military capabilities.

The Army​

The total strength of the Danish Army is approximately 7000-9000 professional troops, excluding conscripts undergoing basic training. In addition the army has a number of reservists attached and the ability to, within a short span of time, mobilize additional prepared light forces.

A Canadian equivalent professional Army would be in the neighbourhood of 53,000 Trained Effectives available for foreign deployment.



Their Armed Forces are organized into an Army, a Navy, an Air Force, a Special Operations Command and a Joint Arctic Command as well as the separate Home Guard.

Norway and Sweden follow a similar pattern.

I know the Army keeps wondering about the value of volunteers. But the Canadian Rangers make it work. And this:

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The big thing about volunteers is that they are volunteering. You can't give volunteers orders. You have to accept what they are willing to give.

And the other big thing that Sam Hughes got right is that it is a social thing - in that it is one of many elements available to tie society together, to each other and to the government.
  • $217,912,613 – Cadets & Junior Rangers
  • 9668 Reserves Supporting Cadets


I can't find the budget for the Canadian Rangers


But I think that there is a role for a Homeguard/Canadian Rangers/Adult Cadet type organization within the Canadian Defence Structure - probably not as a sub-component of the Army, but certainly within DND.
 

Kirkhill

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Here's another Auxiliary/Volunteer model - this one is made in Canada (RCMP) - Three tiers requiring 60, 120 or 180 hours of commitment a year (approximately 6, 12 or 18 days of service - these are broadly consistent with Class A service and the Ranger commitment (Rangers get 12 days pay annually).

Auxiliary Program​

Learn more​

What is it?​

The Auxiliary Program was introduced in 1963 to enhance community policing and crime prevention initiatives. Auxiliaries give their time to help keep our communities safe, and the RCMP values these volunteers greatly and considers them a vital part of the organization.

Who can join?​

Auxiliaries are unarmed, specially trained volunteers. They must be at least 19 years of age, and willing to commit to the program for a minimum of two years.

What's new?​

The RCMP is implementing changes to the Program aimed at keeping our Auxiliaries safer. These changes include national training standards, a new, more identifiable uniform, and three different Tiers of service for provinces to choose from.

Activities:​

These vary from province to province, but can include:

  • Public safety education
  • Crime prevention initiatives
  • Assisting at major events
  • Traffic control
  • General duty operational patrols with Regular Members

Auxiliary Program tiers​

The chart below details the three different levels of service each province can choose from for its respective Auxiliary Program.

Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3
Activities
  • Neighbourhood Watch programs, public education initiatives, non-enforcement support to operations, community fundraising events and participation in parades and public ceremonies.
  • Tier 1 Auxiliaries will perform these activities under the general supervision of an RCMP employee and will not be given peace officer status.
  • Tier 1 Auxiliaries are expected to contribute a minimum of 60 hours per year to the program including training
  • Tier 2 includes all of the activities listed in Tier 1 with the addition of community presence via foot and bicycle, access and traffic control, and disaster assistance. Tier 2 does not include operational patrols.
  • Tier 2 Auxiliaries will be under the close supervision of an RCMP regular member.
  • Tier 2 Auxiliaries are expected to contribute a minimum of 120 hours per year to the program.
  • Tier 3 includes activities from Tier 1 and Tier 2 with the addition of general duty patrol, attending calls, check stops, scene security and searches of persons as directed by a Regular Member.
  • Auxiliaries under Tier 3 will be under the direct supervision of an RCMP regular member.
  • Tier 3 Auxiliaries are expected to contribute a minimum of 180 hours per year to the program.
Training
  • Online RCMP training courses including topics such as crime prevention, conduct, ethics and Auxiliary orientation.
  • External courses: Standard First Aid/CPR/AED course.
  • All Tier 1 Auxiliary training requirements with additional courses added.
  • All Tier 1 and Tier 2 Auxiliary training requirements with additional courses added.
Uniform
  • Grey polo shirt
  • Blue trouser with no stripe to be worn with a black belt and black ankle boots
  • Navy baseball cap/Navy toque (optional)
  • Fluorescent 3-in-1 patrol jacket (optional)
  • Grey duty shirt
  • A high-visibility vest to be worn over the duty shirt at all times
  • Blue trouser with no stripe to be worn with a black leather belt and black ankle boots
  • Navy baseball cap/Navy toque
  • Fluorescent Yellow patrol jacket 3-in-1
  • Soft Body Armour
  • Duty Gloves
  • Slash Resistant Gloves
  • Duty Belt and Operational Accessories
  • Intervention Options (duty belt, baton, handcuffs, etc.)
  • Inclement Weather Trousers
  • Bicycle Shirts and Shorts (duty dependent)
  • Tier 3 uniform is the same as the Tier 2 uniform.

See also the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, various Search and Rescue organizations, St John's Ambulance and Volunteer Fire Departments for concepts on how to manage Volunteers.
 

Colin Parkinson

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The one thing I try to remind organisations of, is that volunteers don't work for free. Everyone volunteers for a reason/need and the question you need to ask is: 'What is it they want and can we give it to them?". Some will settle for a thank you, others want to sit back and watch things happen and get an internal satisfaction. Others want to be honoured and recognised. Your volunteer support and reward program needs to be flexible to accommodate these different needs.
 

daftandbarmy

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The one thing I try to remind organisations of, is that volunteers don't work for free. Everyone volunteers for a reason/need and the question you need to ask is: 'What is it they want and can we give it to them?". Some will settle for a thank you, others want to sit back and watch things happen and get an internal satisfaction. Others want to be honoured and recognised. Your volunteer support and reward program needs to be flexible to accommodate these different needs.

There's a model for that....

Katimavik’s mission is to develop diverse youth as engaged, caring citizens and capable contributors and leaders for a better Canada.

Katimavik collaborates with other organizations to foster understanding, respect and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and with Canada’s other diverse cultures, regions and the environment.

OUR VISION​

Diverse, engaged and empowered youth working together to create just relationships and transform communities, the environment and themselves for a better Canada.

 

Kilted

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Here's another Auxiliary/Volunteer model - this one is made in Canada (RCMP) - Three tiers requiring 60, 120 or 180 hours of commitment a year (approximately 6, 12 or 18 days of service - these are broadly consistent with Class A service and the Ranger commitment (Rangers get 12 days pay annually).




See also the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, various Search and Rescue organizations, St John's Ambulance and Volunteer Fire Departments for concepts on how to manage Volunteers.
St. John Ambulance, there is no s.
 

lenaitch

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I have been both a volunteer and a board member of a registered charity that 'managed' volunteers. It is such a broad category. Agencies responsible for volunteers have to be cognizant of the liability their are accountable for and, in some cases, responsibilities under workers' compensation legislation. It is generally accepted that so-called liability waivers aren't worth the paper they are printed on.

The risk to the 'parent' organization, beyond the risk to things like reputation or image, is generally proportional to the risk (of the volunteer activity) to the public, and is (hopefully) proportional to their vetting, training and the rules/policies governing them. That risk includes how tolerant the organization can be for a volunteer to 'be creative' in their activities. It's an entirely different set of issues for somebody handing out pamphlets at a fair or serving at food bank than it is for auxiliary police, volunteer firefighters or SAR organizations.

Police auxiliaries and volunteer firefighters have their own internal and external command structures and are subject to the same legislation and policies of their professional counterparts.

While it is generally true that volunteers are unpaid (often with the exception of expenses), most if not all volunteer firefighters in Ontario are paid - something - when they are activated. Although most are highly motivated and dedicated, one issue when considering an increased role for volunteers in public safety or domestic security roles is the impact on their paid employment or personal lives. For example, to expect a primary response role of any length in a farming community during harvest or calving season might be unrealistic.

Edit to clarify: Large police services have auxiliary organizational structures, ultimately managed by their parent service. Small departments with only a handful of auxiliary members usually just fall under the chief or designee.
 
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