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Fmr MCpl Patrik Mathews - facing U.S. federal charges/alleged white supremacist

The Bread Guy

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No bail for YOU!
A former Canadian Armed Forces reservist plotted with other members of a white supremacist group to carry out “essentially a paramilitary strike” at a Virginia gun rights rally, a federal prosecutor said Wednesday.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Sullivan agreed to keep Patrik Mathews, 27, detained in federal custody pending a Jan. 30 preliminary hearing.

Mathews leaned back in his chair and quietly laughed when the magistrate read aloud a transcript of a video in which the Canadian national advocated killing people, poisoning water supplies and derailing trains.

“This is a very dangerous person,” the magistrate said during Mathews' detention hearing in Maryland. “He espouses very dangerous beliefs.”

Later Wednesday, Sullivan refused to set bail for another defendant arrested in the FBI's investigation of The Base. A prosecutor described William Garfield Bilbrough IV — a 19-year-old pizza delivery driver who lives with his grandmother in Denton, Maryland — as a leader of the group who was seen as a “prophet” by Mathews and the third man arrested in the case.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Windom showed the judge a photograph recovered from Bilbrough's phone that shows him holding up the severed head of a goat he had killed in a “ritual sacrifice” at a training camp in Georgia for members of The Base. Bilbrough initially tried to kill the goat with a knife but failed, so he borrowed a gun to shoot it, Windom said.

Mathews, Bilbrough and Brian Mark Lemley Jr., 33, of Elkton, Maryland, were arrested Thursday on federal felony charges in Maryland and Delaware, just days before the pro-gun rally in Virginia’s capital. Federal prosecutors said in a court filing Tuesday that a hidden camera captured the men discussing “the planning of violence” at the rally and expressed hope that bloodshed could start a civil war. Monday's event attracted tens of thousands of people and ended peacefully.

“This is a domestic terrorist investigation,” Windom said Wednesday ...
More details here (U.S. media) or in attached bail document referred to in other stories.
 

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Journeyman

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milnews.ca said:
A prosecutor described William Garfield Bilbrough IV — a 19-year-old pizza delivery driver who lives with his grandmother in Denton, Maryland — as a leader of the group who was seen as a “prophet” by Mathews and the third man arrested in the case.
Supremacist all right.          :rofl:
 

The Bread Guy

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The latest ...
Ex-Canadian reservist Patrik Mathews faces up to a maximum of 60 years in U.S. prison if convicted, after he and two other members of The Base, a violent neo-Nazi paramilitary group, were indicted by federal grand juries in Maryland and Delaware this week.

Mathews, 27, who is originally from Beausejour, Man., was arrested in Delaware earlier this month after he fled the country when he was outed as an alleged recruiter for The Base in August.

Alleged Base members Brian Mark Lemley Jr., 33, and William Garfield Bilbrough IV, 19, were arrested this month in Maryland.

Mathews and Lemley Jr. each face several firearms charges, including transporting a firearm and ammunition with intent to commit a felony, and one count of destroying their cellular telephones with intent to obstruct justice.

If convicted, Mathews faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in U.S. federal prison for transporting a firearm and ammunition in interstate commerce with intent to commit a felony offence, and being an alien in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

He faces another 40 years in prison for illegal possession of a firearm, illegal possession of an unregistered firearm, and obstruction of justice.

Lemley Jr. and Bilbrough are charged with conspiring to transport an alien and transporting an alien. Lemley is also charged with transporting a machine gun in interstate commerce.

The 12-count Maryland indictment was returned Monday and unsealed on Tuesday. The six-count Delaware indictment was returned Tuesday ...
 

The Bread Guy

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A bit of Canadian follow-up ...
Canada's military is still defining the term "hateful conduct" as it grapples with how to better detect and discipline white supremacists in its ranks.

In a recent wide-ranging interview with CBC News, military leaders said they have identified areas of improvement and are working toward change. They hope to announce details in the coming months.

"I do understand that sometimes from the outside we might look opaque, but that is due to privacy reasons that we can't divulge specific information," Brig.-Gen. Sylvain Menard, the chief of staff operations for military personnel, said at DND headquarters in Ottawa.

"I think the fact that we're here today trying to demystify and explain what we're doing is our attempt to say, 'No, we are open and transparent.'"

The military has been grappling with a prominent example of extremism in its ranks, following the high-profile arrest of Patrik Mathews, a former Manitoba-based reservist, as part of an FBI undercover operation into a violent white supremacist group called The Base.

(...)

The Canadian military began investigating Mathews in the  spring of 2019, after someone reported comments "incompatible with the Canadian Forces." At the time, he was a former combat engineer with the 38 Canadian Brigade Group in Winnipeg, with training in explosives.

The military fast-tracked his request to be released from the reserves. That officially came through on Aug. 30, 2019.

"It takes a while to conduct these investigations. We have to follow due process, every Canadian has the same right, where innocent until proven guilty, and at the time of release, we just didn't have enough to do anything about Mr. Mathews," Menard said.

"I think it's a success story that we were investigating the member, even though we did not have a chance to fully close the loop." ...
 

The Bread Guy

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Pleads not guilty ...
A former Canadian Forces reservist at the centre of an alleged white-supremacist plot to trigger a race war in the United States pleaded not guilty to weapons charges Tuesday as his lawyer indicated he plans to use the First Amendment of the U.S. constitution to defend his client.

Patrik Mathews, sporting an orange jumpsuit, unruly hair and a long, reddish beard, stood ramrod-straight in a Maryland courtroom as Judge Timothy Sullivan asked him to state his name and whether he fully understood the charges against him.

“Yes, your honour,” replied Mathews, who has been in custody in the U.S. since he and two of his American cohorts were arrested a month ago by the FBI.

Asked for his plea, Mathews said, “Not guilty, your honour.”

(...)

“We, frankly, intend to vigorously contest the charges in this case,” defence counsel Joseph Balter said after Tuesday’s brief arraignment.

(...)
 

CountDC

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"The military fast-tracked his request to be released from the reserves. That officially came through on Aug. 30, 2019."

Wondering exactly what this means?  How did they fast-track it?  I have released a reservist within a week so did they complete his in an hour? 
 

The Bread Guy

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CountDC said:
"The military fast-tracked his request to be released from the reserves. That officially came through on Aug. 30, 2019."

Wondering exactly what this means?  How did they fast-track it?  I have released a reservist within a week so did they complete his in an hour?
First media report of the man in question:  18 Aug 2019

If the release came through 30 Aug 2019, that's 9 working days (including first and last) - may not be a week, but that's faster than in the old days when I was still in.
 

medicineman

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milnews.ca said:
First media report of the man in question:  18 Aug 2019

If the release came through 30 Aug 2019, that's 9 working days (including first and last) - may not be a week, but that's faster than in the old days when I was still in.

I saw one happen in the space of 72 hours - dude went home from work on Friday, come back Monday morning only to be told get your kit together and be escorted around the Base to clear out, handing ID in at the guardhouse by 0930.

You can make anything happen if you want and plan.

MM
 

Old Sweat

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This may not be a record, but it certainly was quick. A certain regular second lieutenant attempted to break into our battery combined mess in the field early one morning. Need I add alcohol was a factor? Anyway, in the process he woke the barman, who took him on. Bang, close arrest until first light. The CO, who had been brought into the situation very quickly, proceeded to Petersville, where, among others, the Adjutant General of the Canadian Army was in attendance observing the exercise. There was a procedure for disposing of unwanted officers called an Adjutant General's Referral. Sunray present one to the great man, and by mid-morning the ex-second lieutenant was standing at the Oromocto Bus Stop with a ticket home and a suitcase of civvies.

For my sins, I was the young gentleman's troop commander, but had been deep in the weeds FOOing with the RHC during all this. On return to our battery bivouac, I was pleasantly surprised to have one less screwup to keep me awake nights..
 

Blackadder1916

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The quickest I've seen was accomplished in under 8 hours.  A soldier of dubious quality was released from cells (had done 7 days guardhouse time - not all that unusual back then in the '70s) and the first thing next morning went to the OR and put in his release.  By the time that he returned to the OR after lunch, having reconsidered his rash decision, found that his request had been approved, a release instruction had been cut and received from NDHQ and that a Cpl was waiting to escort him round to do his clearances.  He was out the gate before 1600 hrs.  The Chief Clerk (a man of infinite talents - was later CFR'ed) was heard to comment (after the soldier had put in his release), "No way is he getting an opportunity to back out, he's gone today".
 

TheSnake

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Blackadder1916 said:
The quickest I've seen was accomplished in under 8 hours.  A soldier of dubious quality was released from cells (had done 7 days guardhouse time - not all that unusual back then in the '70s) and the first thing next morning went to the OR and put in his release.  By the time that he returned to the OR after lunch, having reconsidered his rash decision, found that his request had been approved, a release instruction had been cut and received from NDHQ and that a Cpl was waiting to escort him round to do his clearances.  He was out the gate before 1600 hrs.  The Chief Clerk (a man of infinite talents - was later CFR'ed) was heard to comment (after the soldier had put in his release), "No way is he getting an opportunity to back out, he's gone today".
That's quick was that Reg or Res Force?
 

X Royal

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Quickest I seen was a MSE OP at CFB London.
He was detailed to drive the Base RSM to Hamilton for a mess diner.
After dropping off the Base RSM he proceeded to get drunk and write off the staff car.
Now RSM didn't know why his return ride never showed up.
He was shuttled back to London by various police departments.
MSE Op was on his way out of the base Monday, as the staff car was being brought back to CFB London a flatbed.
 

Blackadder1916

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TheSnake said:
That's quick was that Reg or Res Force?

Regular Force.  1 Field Ambulance.

The individual in question had previously been suspected/accused/denounced (hell, everyone knew thought he had done it) of thieving from other pers when we were on ex in Wainwright, but the manner in which NCOs "arranged" to find evidence precluded having him charged.  The RSM held a parade and, without specifically naming any individual, instructed the gathered troops that he considered such thieves to be the lowest form of life and if NCOs could not properly perform their duty as disciplinarians, then all he wanted to know was where to find the body.  His later charge and detention was unrelated (honestly!) to his previous suspected behaviour.
 

armyvern

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We did an overnighter in Gagetown.

Court Martial concluded in the morning; I got a phone call right afterwards to email over an e-copy of his clothing docs to CTC so they could do a 100% kit check and they advised they'd have him at my office for 1430hrs next day to out-clear. They emailed me a list of everything he was missing and I prepped the Stores Loss Report for his out clearance. I took back his kit and signed his PLCC and handed it to the clerk that was accompanying the escorts. She took away his ID card and headed back to CTC with that and his signed MLR and his escorts took him to the Main gate. Done. Just like that. Quite a few sections jumped to make that one happen so quick.
 

daftandbarmy

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ArmyVern said:
We did an overnighter in Gagetown.

Court Martial concluded in the morning; I got a phone call right afterwards to email over an e-copy of his clothing docs to CTC so they could do a 100% kit check and they advised they'd have him at my office for 1430hrs next day to out-clear. They emailed me a list of everything he was missing and I prepped the Stores Loss Report for his out clearance. I took back his kit and signed his PLCC and handed it to the clerk that was accompanying the escorts. She took away his ID card and headed back to CTC with that and his signed MLR and his escorts took him to the Main gate. Done. Just like that. Quite a few sections jumped to make that one happen so quick.

'He will win whose Army is animated by the same spirit.' Sun Tzu ;)
 

Old Sweat

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A bit off the track, but Gunner lore from the 50s had a certain Lieutenant Colonel EMD Leslie (son of Andy McNaughton and father of Andy Leslie) actually resurrect the old British Army practice of drumming a soldier out of the service. This apparently took place when he was CO of 1 RCHA (and not during the regiment's tour in Korea), and resulted in him receiving a stern talking to from someone of the red-tabbed variety.

Drumming out was reserved for serious offenders, and had the culprit slow marched to a drum roll, or maybe the "Rogue's  March", through the ranks to the barrack gate. Here the youngest soldier in the regiment would administer a kick to his butt to expel him from HM's service.
 
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