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Victoria is facing a public-safety crisis

daftandbarmy

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Sorry, this post of yours got away on me. Lots of OT this week and a double shift yesterday.

I don't have a solution and I don't know what Victoria or BC have tried before. Perhaps it's time to revisit and maybe revive those programs that have worked in the past, stood the test of jurisprudence but were sacrificed on the PC altar to appease social justice warriors. Overlay a good, solid, well thought out and defensible comms strategy to educate the public through implementation and continuation to steady state. It must also be acknowledged that this is not Victoria's problem alone to fix. Some of those problems lie at the feet of the provincial and federal governments to address on Victoria's behalf.

They made a movie once with some pretty good ideas

Sci-Fi Action GIF by Coolidge Corner Theatre
 

medicineman

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Could always string up some daisy chains of PROM1's and Claymores in certain parks and alleyways downtown...be a bit messy at first, but the gulls and the ravens will tidy things up pretty quickly.
 

daftandbarmy

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Cabbie 911:

After 15-minute wait for an ambulance, she called a cab to get to hospital​


When accountant Erin Booth felt faint and disoriented while shopping alone in a Sidney grocery store, she called 911 for help and was put on hold for an ambulance. She waited so long that eventually she took a cab to the hospital.

“I was absolutely shocked,” said Booth. “No one plans on calling 911 so it’s so important people realize having a backup plan might be very important right now while ambulance staffing shortages are worked out.”


And... the beat (ing up) goes on....

Les Leyne: Locking up dangerous people still a no-go despite random attacks​


Politicians are leery about the sensitivities around locking up dangerous people with mental health and addiction problems. The preferred alternatives are “complex care,” “super supportive housing,” and other options that stop short of “involuntary care.”

Still, the idea continues to come up, propelled partly by frightening anecdotes of random attacks being reported on city streets.

 

OldSolduer

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Les Leyne: Locking up dangerous people still a no-go despite random attacks​


Politicians are leery about the sensitivities around locking up dangerous people with mental health and addiction problems. The preferred alternatives are “complex care,” “super supportive housing,” and other options that stop short of “involuntary care.”

Still, the idea continues to come up, propelled partly by frightening anecdotes of random attacks being reported on city streets.

Unfortunately someone will have to be brutally murdered before these idiot politicians do anything. Its not their relatives or friends being harassed by dangerous people. Mark my words as soon as an eminent member of Victoria's "elite" are harmed then it will be a different story.

UNLESS it happens on a Greyhound bus....you get my drift?
 

mariomike

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Cabbie 911:

After 15-minute wait for an ambulance, she called a cab to get to hospital​


When accountant Erin Booth felt faint and disoriented while shopping alone in a Sidney grocery store, she called 911 for help and was put on hold for an ambulance. She waited so long that eventually she took a cab to the hospital.

“I was absolutely shocked,” said Booth. “No one plans on calling 911 so it’s so important people realize having a backup plan might be very important right now while ambulance staffing shortages are worked out.”


And... the beat (ing up) goes on....

How seriously does BCAS take Response Time?

On Time Performance was the Holy Grail in the city I worked. It was about the only real sure thing in this town.

Performance measurements are available to the public.

Does BCAS have anything like that?

Unfortunately someone will have to be brutally murdered before these idiot politicians do anything. Its not their relatives or friends being harassed by dangerous people. Mark my words as soon as an eminent member of Victoria's "elite" are harmed then it will be a different story.

UNLESS it happens on a Greyhound bus....you get my drift?

I would vote for you, if I could, Old Soldier.
 

RedFive

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How seriously does BCAS take Response Time?

On Time Performance was the Holy Grail in the city I worked. It was about the only real sure thing in this town.

Performance measurements are available to the public.

Does BCAS have anything like that?



I would vote for you, if I could, Old Soldier.
They're beyond that now, just trying to keep the lights on and busses on the road. They'll get to you when they get to you.
 

mariomike

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When a BC ambulance is requested to a residence/ workplace, but transportation is refused or not required.

They charge $50. ( If you have a valid BC Care Card. )

50 bucks just to show up, with no transport.

Even if 9-1-1 was called by a third party. Even if you refuse to go. ( Or got tired waiting and called an Uber. )

 

Colin Parkinson

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Persons without valid B.C. medical coverage (e.g. visitors to BC/non-residents), as well as work-related injuries, claims under RCMP, and other federal agencies.



Rates effective April 1, 2020​

$848 flat fee (ground service)

$4,394 per hour (helicopter)

$11 per statute mile (airplane) ($6.94 per kilometre)
 

mariomike

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They'll get to you when they get to you.
Sounds like urban taxpayers in B.C. are going to have to ante up and operate their own departments - if they wish to avoid that.

But, with the Province of British Columbia running the operation ( which from the fees listed sounds pretty lucrative ), I'm not sure if breaking away from BCAS would be politically possible.

I don't know how thorough their record keeping is, but it would be intereting to compare the Unit Hour Utilization ( UHU ) urban vs rural in B.C. and see how Victoria compares with other Canadian cities.



 

daftandbarmy

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Sounds like urban taxpayers in B.C. are going to have to ante up and operate their own departments - if they wish to avoid that.

But, with the Province of British Columbia running the operation ( which from the fees listed sounds pretty lucrative ), I'm not sure if breaking away from BCAS would be politically possible.

I don't know how thorough their record keeping is, but it would be intereting to compare the Unit Hour Utilization ( UHU ) urban vs rural in B.C. and see how Victoria compares with other Canadian cities.

BC's NDP governments have always had eyes bigger than the stomachs of the taxpayers....

Lawrie McFarlane: When ministers focus on shiny baubles, basic services pay the price​


One reason it takes longer to get an ambulance to your door than it takes to deliver a pizza is that vital services are strained past breaking point by inadequate funding, writes Lawrie McFarlane. Jonathan Hayward, CP


On Aug. 27, a 72 year-old Parksville resident, Chuck Blakey, lay dying on his kitchen floor while family members waited for an ambulance to arrive. When they called 911, they were answered by an operator who put them on hold, and played an automated message over and again.
When finally an ambulance did show up, 30 minutes later and 15 minutes too late, Blakey was dead.

On Sept. 14, a Qualicum Beach man waited in agony for an ambulance to arrive. Ian Weir had been through prostate surgery and his bladder was blocked, allowing only a few drops of blood to emerge.

His wife called 911, and was told she was third in line. Exasperated, she ran to the ambulance station two blocks away where she was met with a chilly response.

An ambulance did at last arrive, 30 minutes later. “Seriously,” Weir said, “if I had a gun that night I would have shot myself.”

Nor were these isolated incidents. A 911 operator told the Times Colonist that the tragedy of a man dying while on hold to the ambulance service is a daily occurrence.

So what is going on? This is the kind of thing you’d expect in a third-world city during a Category 5 hurricane, with a metre of water in the streets and the power lines down.

Part of the answer is that we’ve stretched government to the breaking point, and beyond.

Between 1966 and 1996, there had been a huge expansion in the size and scope of the public sector. But the money wasn’t there to pay for it.

 

mariomike

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So what is going on?

Good question.

Work hard all your life. Pay your taxes. Believe the 9-1-1 system will work when you need it.
 

daftandbarmy

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Just another day of 'catch and release' in crazy town-on-sea:


Man released from custody after arrest for firing gun in Victoria street​


A man arrested for firing an air-powered handgun outside a supportive housing facility in downtown Victoria has been released from custody with court-ordered conditions.

While the weapon he was using has been seized, the man, who cannot be identified by police as he has not been charged, has been set free with a court date and orders not to possess weapons.

 

Weinie

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Just another day of 'catch and release' in crazy town-on-sea:


Man released from custody after arrest for firing gun in Victoria street​


A man arrested for firing an air-powered handgun outside a supportive housing facility in downtown Victoria has been released from custody with court-ordered conditions.

While the weapon he was using has been seized, the man, who cannot be identified by police as he has not been charged, has been set free with a court date and orders not to possess weapons.

He should have been released into the Judge’s custody and recognizance.
 

OldSolduer

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Just another day of 'catch and release' in crazy town-on-sea:


Man released from custody after arrest for firing gun in Victoria street​


A man arrested for firing an air-powered handgun outside a supportive housing facility in downtown Victoria has been released from custody with court-ordered conditions.

While the weapon he was using has been seized, the man, who cannot be identified by police as he has not been charged, has been set free with a court date and orders not to possess weapons.

You do make me laugh - wait this isn't the Beaverton's work??

Court ordered conditions mean SFA to career criminals and the criminally mentally ill. They are not worth a hill of beans, but maybe the ivory tower lot believe in magic beans.
 

CBH99

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BC's NDP governments have always had eyes bigger than the stomachs of the taxpayers....

Lawrie McFarlane: When ministers focus on shiny baubles, basic services pay the price​


One reason it takes longer to get an ambulance to your door than it takes to deliver a pizza is that vital services are strained past breaking point by inadequate funding, writes Lawrie McFarlane. Jonathan Hayward, CP


On Aug. 27, a 72 year-old Parksville resident, Chuck Blakey, lay dying on his kitchen floor while family members waited for an ambulance to arrive. When they called 911, they were answered by an operator who put them on hold, and played an automated message over and again.
When finally an ambulance did show up, 30 minutes later and 15 minutes too late, Blakey was dead.

On Sept. 14, a Qualicum Beach man waited in agony for an ambulance to arrive. Ian Weir had been through prostate surgery and his bladder was blocked, allowing only a few drops of blood to emerge.

His wife called 911, and was told she was third in line. Exasperated, she ran to the ambulance station two blocks away where she was met with a chilly response.

An ambulance did at last arrive, 30 minutes later. “Seriously,” Weir said, “if I had a gun that night I would have shot myself.”

Nor were these isolated incidents. A 911 operator told the Times Colonist that the tragedy of a man dying while on hold to the ambulance service is a daily occurrence.

So what is going on? This is the kind of thing you’d expect in a third-world city during a Category 5 hurricane, with a metre of water in the streets and the power lines down.

Part of the answer is that we’ve stretched government to the breaking point, and beyond.

Between 1966 and 1996, there had been a huge expansion in the size and scope of the public sector. But the money wasn’t there to pay for it.

"Live Below Your Means" has always been pretty sound advice when it comes to not being too financially stressed out, and able to ride out the inevitable waves that we all hit. Every government could and should review their operations every few years to find & eliminate wasteful spending, reprioritize spending, and find efficiencies.

And while I realize that every government will inevitably spend more than they bring in, it sounds like BC needs to smarten up right the f**k now.



A consistent factor in several of the posts above have been that people need to wait on hold once they call 911. This is absolutely unacceptable, it's literally the ONLY number people can call if they are experiencing a legitimate emergency. People need to be able to call & speak to an operator, provide the address, and tell the operator what's going on so a unit can already be in route during the remainder of the call. They have to know that when they call 911 for help - extremely professional, well trained, well equipped first responders will be arriving soon to save the day.

- Is the solution to being put on hold after calling 911 to simply hire a few more 911 operators?

- Is being put on hold after calling 911 happening only when it comes to EMS? Or are people calling for the police & fire department also put on hold?

- Are local fire departments not responding to 911 medical calls also? Especially for medical emergencies that are perhaps less urgent in nature, or to begin stabilization of the patient so EMS can transport faster, and be back online faster?



If the province insists on being the sole provider of EMS, and can't provide adequate funding because those funds are being sucked up by the black hole of various social services & mental health programs - something has to give. And it shouldn't have to be the ones who actually pay taxes in that province.

I'm not sure of the exact guaranteed response time here in Edmonton, but the guaranteed response time from Edmonton Fire is approximately 3 minutes. This is for all fire department related calls, as well as a substantial number of EMS related calls. They can arrive, ensure scene safety, assess the situation, start stabilizing a patient if need be, and update in real time the patient status so that when EMS arrives (if delayed for whatever reason) the EMS crew already has a solid grasp on their patient info, status, what has/hasn't been done, etc.
 

CBH99

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Just another day of 'catch and release' in crazy town-on-sea:


Man released from custody after arrest for firing gun in Victoria street​


A man arrested for firing an air-powered handgun outside a supportive housing facility in downtown Victoria has been released from custody with court-ordered conditions.

While the weapon he was using has been seized, the man, who cannot be identified by police as he has not been charged, has been set free with a court date and orders not to possess weapons.

Honestly, f**k that.

I wrote a post based on the tidbit here, then read the article, then deleted my original post....Should have just shot him. Seriously.
 
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