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Navy.ca's Fallen Comrades

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old


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Freedom Is Not Free

I watched the flag pass by one day.
It fluttered in the breeze.
A young Airman saluted it,
And then he stood at ease.

I looked at him in uniform,
So young, so tall, so proud;
With hair cut square and eyes alert,
He stood out in any crowd.

I thought how many men like him,
Had fallen through the years.
How many died on foreign soil?
How many mothers' tears?

How many pilots planes shot down?
How many died at sea?
How many fox holes were soldiers graves?
No freedom is not free.

I heard Taps sound one night,
When everything was still.
I listened to the bugle play,
And felt a sudden chill.

I wondered just how many times,
Taps had meant "Amen,"
When a flag had covered a coffin,
Of a brother or a friend.

I thought of all the children
Of the mothers and the wives.
Of the fathers, sons, and husbands,
With interrupted lives.

I thought about a graveyard,
At the bottom of the sea,
Of unmarked graves at Arlington.
No, Freedom Is Not Free!

- LCDR Kelly Strong, USCG

Viewed 460556 times.
       

It is the soldier, not the reporter who has given us the freedom of the press. It is the soldier, not the poet, who has given us the freedom of speech. It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, who gives us the freedom to demonstrate. It is the soldier who salutes the flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protester to burn the flag.

- Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC

Viewed 460107 times.
       

Order of the day issued to columns as they crossed the Chindwin, February 13th, 1943.

Today we stand on the threshold of battle. The time of preparation is over, and we are moving on the enemy to prove ourselves and our methods. At this moment we stand beside the soldiers of the United Nations in the front line trenches throughout the world. It is always a minority that occupies the front line. It is still a smaller minority that accepts with a good heart tasks like this that we have chosen to carry out. We need not, therefore, as we go forward into the conflict, suspect ourselves of selfish or interested motives. We have all had opportunity of withdrawing and we are here because we have chosen to be here; that is, we have chosen to bear the burden and heat of the day. Men who make this choice are above the average in courage. We need therefore have no fear for the staunchness and guts of our comrades.

The motive which had led each and all of us to devote ourselves to what lies ahead cannot conceivably have been a bad motive. Comfort and security are not sacrificed voluntarily for the sake of others by ill-disposed people. Our motive, therefore, may be taken to be the desire to serve our day and generation in the way that seems nearest to our hand. The battle is not always to the strong nor the race to the swift. Victory in war cannot be counted upon, but what can be counted upon is that we shall go forward determined to do what we can to bring this war to the end which we believe best for our friends and comrades in arms, without boastfulness or forgetting our duty, resolved to do the right so far as we can see the right.

Our aim is to make possible a government of the world in which all men can live at peace and with equal opportunity of service.

Finally, knowing the vanity of man's effort and the confusion of his purpose, let us pray that God may accept our services and direct our endeavours, so that when we shall have done all we shall see the fruit of our labours and be satisfied.

- O.C. Wingate, Commander, 77th Indian Infantry Brigade.

Viewed 457178 times.
       

Artillery is the back bone of the millitary

Viewed 451000 times.
       

Whether you think you can or you think you can't-you're right.

- Henry Ford

Viewed 430164 times.
       

A proper and an adequate response to a situation is almost always a step before a satisfying response.

Viewed 329603 times.
       

Spend a lifetime believing that your not very good at something and find out dying that you had become the very best.

Viewed 325597 times.
       

If you are able, save for them a place inside of you and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.

Be not ashamed to say you loved them, though you may or may not have always. Take what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own.

And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind.

- Major Michael Davis O'Donnell, KIA March 24, 1970 in Cambodia

Viewed 323983 times.
       

The death of one man is tragic, but the death of thousands is statistic

- Joseph Stalin

Viewed 323806 times.
       

A man strikes you, make him bleed. He makes you bleed, you break his bones. He breaks your bones, kill him. Being hit is inevitable, strike back twice as hard.

- Bruce Lee

Viewed 286493 times.
       


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Military Word Of The Day
obsn
:
observation


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Today in Military History

February 25



1787:

1st Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment (Carleton and York), specific date of origin not known


1838:

Amherstburg Ontario - Canadian militia routs American republican sympathizers on Fighting Island, in the Detroit River


1867:

A.G.L. 'Andy' McNaughton 1867-1966


1870:

2nd Battalion, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment (North Shore): Spem Reduxit (Hope restored)


1917:

During fighting along the banks of the Tigris in Mesopotamia, troops from the South Lancashire Regiment (British Army) repeatedly attempted to advance along a gully, but suffered heavy casualties each time from a Turkish machine-gun.  Private Readitt took part in each of five attacks, and on each occasion was the only survivor.  However, the attacks slowly forced the Turks to give ground.  When the officer commanding the operation was killed, Readitt when forward once more, alone and on his own initiative.  He advanced right up to the Turkish position, and although he was unable to remain there for long, he inflicted damage with grenades.  He slowly retired, and located a good defensive position a short distance away, which he proceeded to hold on his own.  Eventually, other soldiers managed to advance and join him, and consolidate the position.  Readitt was awarded the Victoria Cross.


1941:

British troops occupied the capital Mogadishu, as Italian resistance in Somaliland collapsed.


1944:

Bomber Command mounted a devastating attack on Augsburg, the first occasion it had attacked that city in strength. Good weather and poor anti-aircraft defence contributed to a very concentrated attack by 594 aircraft carrying more than 2,000 tons of bombs. The raid proved somewhat controversial, given the level of destruction in the old city centre. Some 700 Germans were killed, but perhaps 90,000 rendered homeless. An important aircraft component factory was successfully damaged, as well as factories associated with the MAN engineering works, which produced U-boat engines.


1945:

Following fierce fighting in Holland, a platoon of The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada had been reduced to just one sergeant and four men during a series of German night counter-attacks. Sergeant Cosens positioned the four riflemen to give him covering fire, then ran to a supporting tank. Standing fully exposed on the tank, he directed its fire to good effect, breaking up another attack. He than asked the tank to bulldoze a way into a German-occupied farm. Cosens went into the farm alone and killed or captured all its defenders. He then succeeded in clearing another two buildings on his own, and was killed by a sniper.


1991:

During the Persian Gulf War, an Iraqi Scud missile hit a U.S. barracks in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing 28 Americans.




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