Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship AOPS

Blackadder1916

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Some of that ice looks just about thick enough to ski on.

Hmmmmm.... :unsure:

Combine two recognized adventure training activities into one. Start off from the ship and marry up a couple of days later at an RV point.

2.7 The following are recognized adventure training activities:
  1. mountaineering, including rock, snow and ice climbing;
  2. caving;
  3. hiking and trekking in rugged terrain, on foot, bicycle, skis or horseback;
  4. canoeing, kayaking and rafting; and
  5. ocean sailing.
 

daftandbarmy

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Combine two recognized adventure training activities into one. Start off from the ship and marry up a couple of days later at an RV point.


I'm wondering how close they could actually get to the North Pole so a chap might make history by approaching it from a completely unexplored route which, unlike other successful pole treks (AFAIK), would be launched not from a land base, but from a start point on deep ocean ice.

If they could drop a sledging party within about 4-500 nm of 90 North that would mean about a 2-3 week ski trip, given good ice conditions and decent weather. It's fairly easy to pack enough food and fuel for an unsupported trip of that duration and sled weights might be around 250-300lbs each, I'd guess. Not an impossible load using the fancy new man hauling sleds they have these days.

We would leave in April with a plan to arrive and plant Pearson's Flag on the top of the barber pole by NLT Queen Victoria's Birthday, for obvious reasons.

But hey, that's just me... :)
 

Colin Parkinson

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The ship is new but that steel has been sitting outside since 2018-19. It does not take long at all for surface rust to form on exposed steel in salt water conditions. Not saying it is rust just that rust happens. Surface rust is fine, ships are designed with the expectation that steel will get thinner over time from rust. It's that long term deep stuff or edges that cause problems.
i just say that I am not overwhelmed by Irving's apparent painting and surface preparation capability.
 

Underway

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Ships been in RCN hands and sailing quite a bit since the handover in the summer. I'm not entirely sure it's Irving at this point. But I'm not going to argue. I don't actually know anything about that stuff aside from the basics, and certainly haven't been on AOPS to even look.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Modern paint technology is pretty awesome, the Lions Gate bridge was painted 10 years ago with high tech paint under climate controlled conditions, it still looks new. In fact the only way these new super ships can exist long enough to pay back their costs is because of improvements in painting technology. It's a whole profession in itself. From what I see , I think Irving either is using old technology/procedures or rushed it to get finished in time with "good enough" workmanship.
 

daftandbarmy

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Now this photo is awesome and i hope they make it into a publicly available poster!
View attachment 64584
wow GIF
 

Navy_Pete

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Modern paint technology is pretty awesome, the Lions Gate bridge was painted 10 years ago with high tech paint under climate controlled conditions, it still looks new. In fact the only way these new super ships can exist long enough to pay back their costs is because of improvements in painting technology. It's a whole profession in itself. From what I see , I think Irving either is using old technology/procedures or rushed it to get finished in time with "good enough" workmanship.

The paint hall at both yards is pretty awesome, and we follow all the normal NACE inspection/QC standards, so not really the issue for new builds there (different story for the refits).

Halifax is one of the rustiest places on earth, so takes no time for any scratches to flash over, so if something gets bumped during assembly or testing and you don't touch it up right away you are foxed. This time of year especially; I used to get salt burns on my lips walking to work. Given that we've had it for months now I would tend to guess a lot of the dings are from us though (but I hate the steel drain piping; you always end up with those huge rust stains down the sides regardless of what you do).
 

Colin Parkinson

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They could reduce the steel piping issue by going for a higher nickel steel, but then of course it has different properties than the steel it welded to, so you might end up with other issues.
So what make Halifax so different rust wise?
 

Navy_Pete

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They could reduce the steel piping issue by going for a higher nickel steel, but then of course it has different properties than the steel it welded to, so you might end up with other issues.
So what make Halifax so different rust wise?
I thought it was an olds maid tale, but something about the humidity level and temperature shifts means there is a tonne of salty condensation everywhere, and car manufacturers use it for testing rust treatments and metals (see link below; not really confirmation but makes sense to me, and had seen that before ). Lower grades of stainless steel weren't, and even a knick on a car paint would flash rust. There would occasionally be power outages because of salt buildup on equipment shorting things out.

I've never encountered anything like it and some days you could taste the brine in the air and it would build up in my beard and hair, it was crazy. Actually felt less salty in the middle of the ocean. Probably similar throughout the Maritimes, but Halifax generally had a bit of a strange microclimate around the harbour, possibly because it was a big bowl with some pretty big elevation changes over a few short blocks going up from the water with a whole lot of concrete and ashphalt to hold in the heat. I was about 10 feet above my neighbour across the street, and the house behind me was about 30 feet above me in elevation.

That's before they put down a bunch of salt for all the constant freeze/thaw cycles that make the sidewalks treacherous; on the same walk would get puffs of salt dust as I walked along, or be falling on my arse all the time. I miss some things about being on the East coast, but my car is lasting a lot longer.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glo...e-maritimes-rust-never-sleeps/article4180574/
 

Weinie

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I thought it was an old maids tale, but somethings about the humidity level and temperature shifts means there is a tonne of salty condensation everywhere, and car manufacturers use it for testing rust treatments and metals (see link below; not really confirmation but makes sense to me, and had seen that before ). Lower grades of stainless steel weren't, and even a knick on a car paint would flash rust. There would occasionally be power outages because of salt buildup on equipment shorting things out.

I've never encountered anything like it and some days you could taste the brine in the air and it would build up in my beard and hair, it was crazy. Actually felt less salty in the middle of the ocean. Probably similar throughout the Maritimes, but Halifax generally had a bit of a strange microclimate around the harbour, possibly because it was a big bowl with some pretty big elevation changes over a few short blocks going up from the water with a whole lot of concrete and ashphalt to hold in the heat. I was about 10 feet above my neighbour across the street, and the house behind me was about 30 feet above me in elevation.

That's before they put down a bunch of salt for all the constant freeze/thaw cycles that make the sidewalks treacherous; on the same walk would get puffs of salt dust as I walked along, or be falling on my arse all the time. I miss some things about being on the East coast, but my car is lasting a lot longer.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glo...e-maritimes-rust-never-sleeps/article4180574/
I grew up in Nova Scotia, but had been away for a long period of time. I went back on vacation about 10 years ago, and because I am both a big wine drinker, and supporter of all things N.S., went to Jost Vineyards in Malagash. They have a great tour and tasting set-up, but every one of their wines tasted salty. After the third tasting, I remarked on this to the sommelier, his response was "That's what gives Jost wines their distinctive taste, aroma, and body. My response was " And that's why I won't be buying your wine."
We spent a week at the cottage. We are on the north shore of N.S., opposite Halifax, but salt air permeates everything you do. I can smell it when I get to Aulac, just inside the N.B. border, across from Amherst, just on the other side of the border, and my home town.

There are a ton of century houses in Amherst, many brick/and/or stone. The effect of the salt air on the stone and the mortar is crazy. Navy Pete is not embellishing, you just get born with it, get used to it, or fight it.(or all three)
 

Blackadder1916

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I'm wondering how close they could actually get to the North Pole so a chap might make history by approaching it from a completely unexplored route which, unlike other successful pole treks (AFAIK), would be launched not from a land base, but from a start point on deep ocean ice.

If they could drop a sledging party within about 4-500 nm of 90 North that would mean about a 2-3 week ski trip, given good ice conditions and decent weather. It's fairly easy to pack enough food and fuel for an unsupported trip of that duration and sled weights might be around 250-300lbs each, I'd guess. Not an impossible load using the fancy new man hauling sleds they have these days.

We would leave in April with a plan to arrive and plant Pearson's Flag on the top of the barber pole by NLT Queen Victoria's Birthday, for obvious reasons.

But hey, that's just me... :)

Others have launched from a vessel.


But yeah, it would make for an interesting trek.
 

daftandbarmy

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Others have launched from a vessel.


But yeah, it would make for an interesting trek.

Well, after saying this:

Says Gamme, “The great modern polar exploration era ended with that trip.”

You just know that's like a red rag to a bull ;)
 

Kirkhill

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Now that the navy has got ahold of the ships have they decided how many berths they are leaving for Pongos? It seems to me the original design was for 45 crew and 40 pax. I've seen reference to an RCN crew of 66 which would only leave room for 19 pax. I am assuming that the 19 pax also includes people like an RCAF air det, an RCMP liaison, and FPO, INA, CCG and other Odd Government types.

Or am I wrong to assume that the RCN still rebels at the notion of muddy, leather soled boots stomping all over their bare feet and holystoned decks?

While on the subject - how many passengers are the CSCs now expected to carry in RCN service?
 

Stoker

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Now that the navy has got ahold of the ships have they decided how many berths they are leaving for Pongos? It seems to me the original design was for 45 crew and 40 pax. I've seen reference to an RCN crew of 66 which would only leave room for 19 pax. I am assuming that the 19 pax also includes people like an RCAF air det, an RCMP liaison, and FPO, INA, CCG and other Odd Government types.

Or am I wrong to assume that the RCN still rebels at the notion of muddy, leather soled boots stomping all over their bare feet and holystoned decks?

While on the subject - how many passengers are the CSCs now expected to carry in RCN service?
68 crew and a 20 person mess for riders I do believe and that can all change due to mission.
 

Weinie

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Now that the navy has got ahold of the ships have they decided how many berths they are leaving for Pongos? It seems to me the original design was for 45 crew and 40 pax. I've seen reference to an RCN crew of 66 which would only leave room for 19 pax. I am assuming that the 19 pax also includes people like an RCAF air det, an RCMP liaison, and FPO, INA, CCG and other Odd Government types.

Or am I wrong to assume that the RCN still rebels at the notion of muddy, leather soled boots stomping all over their bare feet and holystoned decks?

While on the subject - how many passengers are the CSCs now expected to carry in RCN service?
Berths......pffft. You can sleep at least a battalion of Pongos on the decks on all levels. Bivvy bags for all.

Cookie might be a little overworked.........unless IMP's.
 

Kirkhill

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Typical. Bolshies get the bunks and the showers. Hammocks for the real workers.
 
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