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Vancouver, Surrey voters elect new mayors; bring promises of more police, RCMP stays

daftandbarmy

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Well, well, well... ;)

Anticipation Popcorn GIF
 

lenaitch

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Can folks here confirm that only BC communities that have their own municipal police service have a Police Board. If true, does RCMP leadership have any formal accountability to their contracted municipalities? Just curious.
 

Booter

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As far as I know the contracted communities are part of a consultative process where they set priorities and those priorities are measured for performance.

It’s not a true police board relationship however. A few years back I did one for a large municipal contract, and where their needs ran contrary to Ottawa policy they we were told to get f***ed and we had to adhere to national, even where the city would pay 100% of cost.

The cities response was “then we need our own force” and I agreed with them. 🤷‍♀️
 

daftandbarmy

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Can folks here confirm that only BC communities that have their own municipal police service have a Police Board. If true, does RCMP leadership have any formal accountability to their contracted municipalities? Just curious.

'Contract' suggests 'accountability', but I don't know how those contracts roll so....
 

brihard

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Can folks here confirm that only BC communities that have their own municipal police service have a Police Board. If true, does RCMP leadership have any formal accountability to their contracted municipalities? Just curious.
That appears to be the case. Surrey does have its own Police Service Board, and they are the legal employer of Surrey Police Service.

I can’t speak to exactly how the contract accountability works.
 

Booter

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That appears to be the case. Surrey does have its own Police Service Board, and they are the legal employer of Surrey Police Service.

I can’t speak to exactly how the contract accountability works.
I could probably to a specific question 🤷‍♀️
 

lenaitch

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Thanks for the responses. I was just curious how the accountability worked for RCMP contract policing in BC (and I supposed, by extension, all of the other contract provinces). In Ontario, every municipality that either maintains its own service or contracts another service, including the OPP, to provide policing services, has to maintain a Police Services Board. There are a variety of rules regarding composition, size, etc. If the OPP provides services without a contract (so-called 'fee for service' coverage), that municipality has to maintain a Police Advisory Committee.
 

Booter

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Thanks for the responses. I was just curious how the accountability worked for RCMP contract policing in BC (and I supposed, by extension, all of the other contract provinces). In Ontario, every municipality that either maintains its own service or contracts another service, including the OPP, to provide policing services, has to maintain a Police Services Board. There are a variety of rules regarding composition, size, etc. If the OPP provides services without a contract (so-called 'fee for service' coverage), that municipality has to maintain a Police
Thanks for the responses. I was just curious how the accountability worked for RCMP contract policing in BC (and I supposed, by extension, all of the other contract provinces). In Ontario, every municipality that either maintains its own service or contracts another service, including the OPP, to provide policing services, has to maintain a Police Services Board. There are a variety of rules regarding composition, size, etc. If the OPP provides services without a contract (so-called 'fee for service' coverage), that municipality has to maintain a Police Advisory Committee.
That advisory committee isn’t really a thing for us, there is a calculation based off population that’s national- and then there is what the province is willing to chip in on or the municipality.

the type of contract can be with the province or a municipality- at the beginning of the year stakeholders from each community served- if it’s say a detachment for several communities- are canvassed for their priorities. Those are included for the year and reported on. They have little say really when it comes to tailoring their service locally, they will sometimes get into a thing where it’s like “we pay for 18% of night shift and community x only pays 12- so we need to see a police car x amount of times” and new det coms will try and do that. It doesn’t work.

A municipality that owns it detachment has slightly more control but in a meaningful sense they can’t really control things- like say community x wants stolen vehicles dealt with. That’s the priority. They can’t say “we want to purchase this system that allows us to deal with stolen cars”- our policies keep that off the table.

It is a very common statement for a municipality to suggest they want their own force so they can control the how. Cape Breton regional police came about that way- and the flip flopping of control over what in that patchwork is directly related to the demand for meaningful control.

When they see the price of having that extra control that’s where they back off.
 

daftandbarmy

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Meanwhile, in Surrey:

Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum returns city car with major damage: Councillor​

Surrey RCMP said it has investigated and concluded there was no criminal offence related to the driver of the vehicle

The Surrey RCMP has determined there is no criminal investigation after a City of Surrey-owned car was returned with significant front-end damage to a works yard.

Surrey Coun. Jack Hundial said the car appears to be the one driven by outgoing Mayor Doug McCallum throughout his term in office. Hundial posted a picture of the white Buick with damage above the passenger-side wheel well on Twitter on Sunday, a day after McCallum lost the civic election to former Surrey councillor Brenda Locke.



And, they have a green light to pull the plug on the SPS:

 
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RangerRay

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This woman for Prime Minister!

"His face is kind of peely and scaly, so I made a reference to him having a scaly face ... I called him a scaly-faced motherf--ker," Johnstone said.
She was on FIRE 🔥! No wonder McCallum pretended she drove over his foot (allegedly).
 

Navy_Pete

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She was on FIRE 🔥! No wonder McCallum pretended she drove over his foot (allegedly).
They caught the whole thing on surveillance video (it's hard to see, but in the upper middle portion of the screen)

He is screwed; no way she ran over his foot as he didn't react at all, walked normally after that, and then went and did his shopping.
 

Weinie

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They caught the whole thing on surveillance video (it's hard to see, but in the upper middle portion of the screen)

He is screwed; no way she ran over his foot as he didn't react at all, walked normally after that, and then went and did his shopping.
He formulated his revenge while doing his shopping, whilst oblivious that everything is on CCTV these days. Dumbass deserves everything he gets.
 
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