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British Military Current Events

reveng

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So here's a thought. Put the better part of a heavy brigade's equipment into Europe. Keep a good portion in Canada as training equipment. Organize a manning ratio of enough Reg F to provide all key leadership, technical, planning etc roles into capable hands but man the largest bulk of the force with reservists. Do flyover Milcons. Betcha your recruiting and retention and volunteers for exercises would spike.

There are literally dozens of things that you can do if only you're prepared to pull the thumb out of your butt and try something better. But noooo ... we'll keep on muddling along the way we always have, fine tuning stuff the way that has failed over and over again in the past, until the NDP get elected and shut everything down (or the Libs figure out they could simply shut down a brigade and a fighter squadron and five ships, save a five billion a year to spend on child care or a needle exchange or whatever, and no one would miss it).

:D
It's an option. I'd be more inclined to have the Europeans put up the heavy forces for their own defence, and have countries like the UK and Canada find other useful ways to contribute. That's just me though.

You are correct that there are literally dozens of things we could do, and also I believe you to be correct that we will keeping fumbling along status quo. At least it makes for interesting discussion.
 

reveng

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Since there's a lot of interest in Armd/Mech forces:

1. What about establishing a properly manned & equipped tank regiment in Europe with the purpose of having it act as an aggressor force against other NATO units? Or as part of a UK force, since they are going to be shorter on tanks? With the ability to deploy up to a Sqn at a time to another operation somewhere if we need to?

2. Armd get rid of TAPV. Focus on LAV LRSS (is that still happening?) as well as work towards future technologies. Aim to provide the most capable & survivable Armd Recce units in NATO. These could tie into LRPF capabilities that also need to be built.

3. Maybe look at Light Cav? Would that be a good role for the PRes Armd? (Or for whoever doesn't get the LAV/equiv veh) The UK have deployed Light Cav to Poland, and they are currently in Mali...

Once again, I realize none of these will happen. Just some ideas.
 

daftandbarmy

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Since there's a lot of interest in Armd/Mech forces:

1. What about establishing a properly manned & equipped tank regiment in Europe with the purpose of having it act as an aggressor force against other NATO units? Or as part of a UK force, since they are going to be shorter on tanks? With the ability to deploy up to a Sqn at a time to another operation somewhere if we need to?

2. Armd get rid of TAPV.
Focus on LAV LRSS (is that still happening?) as well as work towards future technologies. Aim to provide the most capable & survivable Armd Recce units in NATO. These could tie into LRPF capabilities that also need to be built.

3. Maybe look at Light Cav? Would that be a good role for the PRes Armd? (Or for whoever doesn't get the LAV/equiv veh) The UK have deployed Light Cav to Poland, and they are currently in Mali...

Once again, I realize none of these will happen. Just some ideas.

You're assuming that this would all be in service of a clear foreign policy strategy, of course.

And 'get rid of TAPV'? What's that all about? I mean, how else can the Reg F unload (and therefore justify) its expensive and embarrassing mistakes if it wasn't for the Reserves :)
 

Kirkhill

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Delivering “Global Britain”—A Naval Perspective​


By Commander René Balletta, Royal Navy
April 2021

Proceedings

Vol. 147/4/1,418


Key Elements

Forward Presence
Carrier Strike
Future Commando Force

Forward Presence - Floating Embassies

Forward presence initially will see the forward deployment of the Batch 2 offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) into regions where they will remain indefinitely, conducting crew rotations at a set periodicity as well as all maintenance periods.

OPV HMS Medway - Caribbean
OPV HMS Trent - Mediterranean/West Africa
OPV HMS Clyde - South Atlantic
OPVs HMS Spey and HMS Tamar - Indo-Pacific
FFG HMS Montrose - Persian/Arabian Gulf

While Clyde and Trent will have existing British military bases that sit in the middle of their operating areas (Falklands and Gibraltar), the remaining OPVs will operate without any permanent base in their operational theatre. This will allow them the freedom of manoeuvre to operate across the whole of their vast regions without a need to return to a single support hub. In the Caribbean, HMS Medway will utilise a mixture of allied military and civilian facilities, such as Fort de France in Martinique, the continental United States, the Dutch Antilles, and British Overseas Territories. In the Indo-Pacific, the two units will be able to utilise host-nation support in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Japan, and Australia, as well as Diego Garcia, India, and Oman in the Indian Ocean.

The intent is to replace the Batch 2 OPVs with the Type 31 multirole frigates in regions that require a more robust capabilities suite, such as in the Indo-Pacific, and this will commence in 2027. While the OPVs are equipped to undertake humanitarian aid and disaster relief (HADR), counterterrorism, maritime security (including counterpiracy), and defence engagement, the Type 31 will provide that extra level of self-defence and offensive capabilities necessary for enhancing peace and security where the risks from major power competition may be on the rise.

There is concern that two OPVs stationed so far from home are likely to get into more trouble than they can get themselves out of. With good diplomacy and the right political messaging, this is unlikely to be the case, and a British presence will be seen as a stabilising force for good, despite China’s rhetoric that “Global Britain” is a return to colonialism. The United Kingdom has increasing economic interests as well as historic partnerships in the Indo-Pacific and, therefore, will want to preserve international peace and security to sustain the stability of the international rules-based system. Conflict and war do little for prosperity and will want to be avoided by all concerned.


Carrier Strike

Operating out of UK - Primary commitment to NATO but available to support Foreign Missions

In support of all five globally deployed OPVs and HMS Montrose in the Gulf, the First Sea Lord’s plan is to operate at least one carrier strike group (CSG) out of the United Kingdom. This will surge as required to deliver the higher-level capabilities that may be needed anywhere in the world, but basing in the United Kingdom underlines its commitment to NATO and the Atlantic. The first deployment will see HMS Queen Elizabeth deploying to the Far East later this year, with U.S. Navy escorts and U.S. Marine Corps aircraft to provide reassurance to the region and possibly ahead of the forward deployment of the two OPVs. This will also coincide with the 50th anniversary of the FPDA.


Future Commando Force

Littoral Response Groups

LRG UK (Northern Flank and Europe)
LRG Oman (Indo-Pacific and Gulf)

In addition to the carrier strike group, future commando force will deliver a littoral strike capability. This is likely to be delivered through two littoral response groups (LRGs). The first will be based out of the United Kingdom to support the Northern Flank and European interests, and a second is envisaged to be based out of Duqm in Oman, where the United Kingdom has established a logistics hub to support its global “force for good” ambitions. Decisions have yet to be made on the composition of the LRG, but the Royal Navy has two landing platform docking (LPDs) vessels and three landing ships docking auxiliary (LSDAs) at its disposal. The Royal Marines will go back to their roots as a truly expeditionary littoral force that can operate in any climate, from the frozen wastes of the Arctic to the jungles of Brunei and Belize. These strike groups will be able to surge into any littoral area throughout the world to support the forward-deployed units.



Discussion of the Moral Equivalency of China's Nine Dash Line vs the UK/US position on The Chagos Islands of the British Indian Ocean Territory and the lease of Diego Garcia to the US and the need to resolve the matter. The UK's current position is "needs must" and it will be open to discussions when it no longer holds military value.



Finally

Realized advantages of leaving ships on station and swapping crews

The changes in operating methods brought about by forward presence already have resulted in a number of significant advantages to the Royal Navy. There has been an increase in the number of days on operations, as fewer days are spent in transit to and from the United Kingdom. This has, in turn, reduced fuel costs. With the same crews rotating through a single unit, regional situational awareness also has seen a marked increase, as patterns of life become second nature. However, an additional advantage seen on board Montrose was the impact of such a routine on manpower. Societal changes have been slowly eroding recruitment and retention, as sailors want to be able to plan their lives and not be dictated to by operational circumstance, usually at very short notice. The move to crew rotations has provided some of the stability they sought, and the rigid crew cycles have allowed them to plan their lives accordingly, up to three years in advance.
 

daftandbarmy

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Key Elements

Forward Presence
Carrier Strike
Future Commando Force

Forward Presence - Floating Embassies



OPV HMS Medway - Caribbean
OPV HMS Trent - Mediterranean/West Africa
OPV HMS Clyde - South Atlantic
OPVs HMS Spey and HMS Tamar - Indo-Pacific
FFG HMS Montrose - Persian/Arabian Gulf








Carrier Strike

Operating out of UK - Primary commitment to NATO but available to support Foreign Missions




Future Commando Force

Littoral Response Groups

LRG UK (Northern Flank and Europe)
LRG Oman (Indo-Pacific and Gulf)





Discussion of the Moral Equivalency of China's Nine Dash Line vs the UK/US position on The Chagos Islands of the British Indian Ocean Territory and the lease of Diego Garcia to the US and the need to resolve the matter. The UK's current position is "needs must" and it will be open to discussions when it no longer holds military value.



Finally

Realized advantages of leaving ships on station and swapping crews

The post-Brexit UK military will begin to look alot like the Pre-WW1 UK military... with WiFi of course :)
 

Kirkhill

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Just checking on those OPVs

Crew of 58

50x Marines

1x 30mm
2x Miniguns
2x GPMG

I reckon they are well set up to repel boarders if they have to sail up the Yangtze.

Charlton Heston? 100 55 days at Peking? Or Steve McQueen? Sand Pebbles? :unsure: :)
 

Ostrozac

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Just checking on those OPVs

Crew of 58

50x Marines

1x 30mm
2x Miniguns
2x GPMG

I reckon they are well set up to repel boarders if they have to sail up the Yangtze.

Charlton Heston? 100 55 days at Peking? Or Steve McQueen? Sand Pebbles? :unsure: :)
They will be just the ticket against smugglers or pirates, but as you point out they would get quickly chewed up in a confrontation with the Russians or the Chinese. Horses for courses, right? Of course, there is risk involved, someone might look at the OPV, see it’s a warship painted grey, and put it into a fight outside of its weight class. But the alternative is overcompensating the other way, and you end up doing your fishery patrols with $4 billion dollar cutting edge platforms decked out with Tomahawks and ASW gear.
 
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